Article by: Perry Romanowski

To be a good cosmetic chemist, you’ll want to generate a lot of creative ideas. Unfortunately, it’s pretty tough to come up with new ideas. With thousands of new cosmetic products being launched each year, it can start to seem like all the ideas have been generated. But if you ask the right questions, you can generate ideas that you never even thought about. In this series of cosmetic innovation posts, we’ll pose scenarios or questions that you can use to generate new product or innovative ideas.

Scenario 1

Imagine none of your customers can see color or smell fragrance. How would you make your cosmetic formulations stand out?

For previous exercises see the cosmetic innovation page.

5 comments

  1. Mark Fuller

    Well, this is an easy question to answer. It will all be dependent upon the skin “feel” and the “finish.”
    We take the properties of our products for granted sometimes. You must artificially evaluate the product in phases; initial rub-in and finish. There may be other terms people use. Also the “cushion” of the product is an issue. As you learn to evaluate these characteristics and develop the skills to alter each phase when needed you will come a long way.

  2. paulina

    And another question: is butylene/propoylene (?) glycol comedogenic?

    1. Perry

      No, neither butylene glycol or propylene glycol are comedogenic.

  3. paulina

    Is SLES/SLS really bad for our skin?

    1. Perry

      Depends on what you do with it. If you use it in a cleansing product that you rinse away, it is perfectly fine for skin.

      If you put it on your skin and leave it there for an extended period of time, it will cause irritation and redness.

      In fact, when we do irritation tests, SLS is used as the positive control (meaning it causes a reaction in almost everyone). SLES is slightly less irritating.

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