Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Best source of Caffeine for eye creams

  • Best source of Caffeine for eye creams

    Posted by Symbiosis on July 26, 2023 at 6:29 am

    Hi all,

    I am doing some formulation on an eye cream and I am having trouble with the Caffeine source, I don’t know what is the best or cleanest source, coffee, tea, synthetic, etc. I can’t find much data and most ingredients just list “caffeine”.

    Also not sure on a proper dosage. I don’t want to over or under dose it.

    I have tried some of the coffee extract from one of the online ingredient sources but it is pretty brown and tinted the cream a little too much.

    Thanks for any advice.

    PhilGeis replied 8 months, 2 weeks ago 8 Members · 10 Replies
  • 10 Replies
  • Ifa

    Member
    October 29, 2023 at 12:14 am

    Curious to know this as well. Can someone help?

  • Paprik

    Member
    October 29, 2023 at 4:58 pm

    You can source pure caffeine. Myskinrecipes have some encapsulated. I source it here in NZ in normal form.

    I use it at 2% around the eyes. But if I remember correctly TheOrdinary have 5% serum?

  • suswang8

    Member
    October 29, 2023 at 10:17 pm

    Loads of sites in Europe carry it, such as Skinchakra.

    Caffeine is known for being an antioxidant, but I don’t know what evidence there is in published literature re: cosmetic effects around the eye area.

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    November 3, 2023 at 1:15 pm

    <div>Kaffe Bueno just released upcycled coffee materials featuring - what else? - caffeine. Kelly Dobos is hosting a UL Prospector free seminar in a few days and y’all may want to tune in.</div>

    Upcycling Coffee to Accelerate the Transition to Natural | UL Solutions (livestorm.co)

  • PhilGeis

    Member
    November 5, 2023 at 6:11 am

    Thanks. Pretty casual “science” published in a second rate journal. I’d not put too much significance to normal product use/benefit. They tested a product with 30% EMU oil, not the ingredients or vitamins; control/placebo was not defined; 11 subjects split between test and placebo in unidentified numbers; product application via pad was uncontrolled; technical benefits reported vs visual expression,; questionable interpretation (Fig 3 - claimed benefit when errors bars clearly overlapped).

    • PhilGeis

      Member
      November 5, 2023 at 9:01 am

      Sorry - 10% Emu oil.

Log in to reply.