Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Why are non-polar hydrocarbons killing my emulsion viscosity?

  • Why are non-polar hydrocarbons killing my emulsion viscosity?

    Posted by Graillotion on July 5, 2023 at 9:55 pm

    I am some kind of freak when it comes to emollients. I have a room full of them. I love experimenting with them neat on the skin…seeing how they absorb, and observing after-feel… 30 min to two hours later.

    Twice in the last year… Hemisqualane ( C13-15 Alkane) coaxed me into inserting it into an existing, well tested formula…where when it was added at 2%, it totally blew the viscosity!


    What did @Pharma not teach me…that I am overlooking? Is there some simple hack to keep from losing major viscosity? I would love to use this ingredient, but not with this much formula disruption…. I can go back into that room..and pull another one off the shelf….but I am stubborn and intrigued.


    Aloha.


    If you want to link an article, or good read….I am always up for further education.


    FYI: The favorites in my collection are: Ethylhexyl Isononanoate, gotta love those branched chain esters, and Dicaprylyl Carbonate. As most of you know…I hate a greasy/oily feel.

    • This discussion was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by  Graillotion.
    Graillotion replied 9 months, 2 weeks ago 4 Members · 9 Replies
  • 9 Replies
  • Perry44

    Administrator
    July 6, 2023 at 12:53 pm

    It depends on whatโ€™s in your formula, but increasing oil content can modify micelles which can change viscosity.

    • Graillotion

      Member
      July 6, 2023 at 3:24 pm

      I always sub out 2% of the emollient package, to introduce the 2% hydrocarbon. So oil phase ratios stay the same.

      Are you saying…this is an odd situation?

      • Perry44

        Administrator
        July 7, 2023 at 5:59 am

        Not all oils are the same and they can affect the micelle structure differently even if the ratio is the same.

  • Paprik

    Member
    July 6, 2023 at 4:52 pm

    Sorry, I was replaying to a wrong topic.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by  Paprik.
  • ketchito

    Member
    July 6, 2023 at 6:11 pm

    Your regular emulsion has a high viscosity because you got a complex micellar arrangement (worm-like or rods, that can even be entangled). When you introduce hydrocarbons, they go to the core of your micelles and cause a transition from worm-like (viscous) to spherical (non viscous). Just a question, are you emulsifying the hydrocarbon with the whole oil phase? Or adding it after?

    • Graillotion

      Member
      July 6, 2023 at 8:06 pm

      I am just adding it to the lipid phase in an O/W emulsion.

      I have learned over the years…that certain ingredients prefer to work with certain emulsifiers.

      This particular emulsion was M 202 + GSC+GMS+Sucrose Stearate, plus typical builders.

      (SS in the water phase, so it is hydrated and ready to work…upon combining.)

      Use of fatty alcohols…assumed.

      I had…subbed all the steric hindrance aspects over to .5% SeaBalance…in an experiment, but don’t believe this was fundamental in the viscosity loss. I had a similar result a year ago, before SeaBalance was even a twinkle in my eye.

      • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by  Graillotion.
    • Graillotion

      Member
      July 6, 2023 at 8:49 pm

      @ketchito is there a hack you implement, if you are using hydrocarbons in a formula?

  • ketchito

    Member
    July 7, 2023 at 8:06 am

    I’d try to pair emulsifiers with a bit more similar structure so lamellae has better packing (the sucrose in your sucrose stearate might have a negative steric effect).

    By the way, what is SS? ๐Ÿ˜… I’d also increase viscosity of your water phase (HEC might work, but I prefer something with emulsifying properties, like Structure XL….or even Natrosol Plus 330).

    • Graillotion

      Member
      July 7, 2023 at 2:11 pm

      SS = Sucrose stearate / sucrose esters.

      I guess I will work around the hydrocarbon, as I have many alternatives, and prefer my formulas to serve as frameworks for other formulas, where I can just drop about anything in. If I tailor it to the hydrocarbon, that means I would have to reformulate…on the next similar formula….and dang if I’m not lazy. ๐Ÿ™‚

      My initial thought is, I will just bump the Lauryl Laurate. What isn’t better, with more of that?

      • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by  Graillotion.

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