Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating What are these small yellow things in bottom of the bottle?

  • What are these small yellow things in bottom of the bottle?

    Posted by Abdullah on October 20, 2021 at 2:36 am
    I made this liquid foam face wash,i don’t if this the the name. It has low level of surfactants,is low viscosity,has foam pump and during pumping foam comes out of it. please tell if it has a specific name.

    Now there are some small things in the bottom of the bottle. I did put them in five bottles and all of them now has this stuf. Them smell is good and it work as it did in the past. any idea what they may be.

    lOI
    Water

    SLES 2% active
    SLS 1% active
    Decyl Glucoside 0.5% active
    CAPB 0.5% active
    Guar gum 0.028%
    Cationic guar gum 0.028%
    PQ10 0.028%
    Phenoxyethanol/caprylyl Glycol 9/1 1%
    Citric acid powder 1%
    Fragrance oil 0.2%
    EDTA 0.2%
    pH 5

    Abdullah replied 2 years, 7 months ago 4 Members · 9 Replies
  • 9 Replies
  • Syl

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 2:57 am

    I suspect it is the Guar gum 0.028%. This ingredient never dissolved well when I was making shampoo, or body wash. 

  • Abdullah

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 8:10 am

    @Syl is it because of low quantity or the ingredient itself? 

  • ketchito

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 11:44 am

    @Abdullah At such low level of anionic surfactants, it’s for sure that either Cationic guar gum or/and PQ-10 will form an insoluble coacervate. You need to have an excess of anionic surfactant compared to your cationic polymers to dissolve the coacervate. 

  • MarkBroussard

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 12:11 pm

    Depending on the Guar, the best way to dissolve it is by pre-hydrating in prodopanediol or glycerin, add it to the vessel, heat and drop the pH to 4.0 with citric acid as the first step in your process.

  • Abdullah

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 2:49 pm

    ketchito said:

    @Abdullah At such low level of anionic surfactants, it’s for sure that either Cationic guar gum or/and PQ-10 will form an insoluble coacervate. You need to have an excess of anionic surfactant compared to your cationic polymers to dissolve the coacervate. 

    @ketchito i don’t know what percentage of surfactant is usual in this type of product but in my experience if i increase the percentage of surfactants the amount of foam that comes out of the pump decreases. 

    In comparison to anionic surfactant the cationic polymers are also low quantity. It is like 10.7:0.2 anionic surfactant: cationic polymer that i thought is ok. Do you suggest to reduce the amount of polymer even more? 

  • Abdullah

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 2:51 pm

    Depending on the Guar, the best way to dissolve it is by pre-hydrating in prodopanediol or glycerin, add it to the vessel, heat and drop the pH to 4.0 with citric acid as the first step in your process.

    @MarkBroussard is heating necessary for non-ionic guar gum? 

  • MarkBroussard

    Member
    October 20, 2021 at 3:53 pm

    @Abdullah:

    Check with the manufacturer of the Guar you are using to get the best directions on use.

  • ketchito

    Member
    October 21, 2021 at 11:26 am

    @Abdullah You’re right, I missed one “0” when I checked the levels. As few members here mentioned, you should check then the addition method. Try with Ashland (they have very good literature on both guar gum and cationic guar). They usually recommend to add cationic polymers to the water, then CAPB, non ionic surfactants, and then the anionic surfactants.

  • Abdullah

    Member
    October 21, 2021 at 1:01 pm

    Thanks Ketchito

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