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Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Color and makeup Titanium dioxide with Castor oil

  • Titanium dioxide with Castor oil

    Posted by saraahsan on August 18, 2019 at 10:05 pm

    i mixed titanium dioxide with castor oil to make liquid concentration to be added in my Lipstick. but it starts bubbling as you can see in picture. is it normal? 

    saraahsan replied 3 years, 9 months ago 4 Members · 12 Replies
  • 12 Replies
  • OldPerry

    Professional Chemist / Formulator
    August 19, 2019 at 12:24 am

    What did you use to mix it?

  • saraahsan

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 12:26 am

    i used a steel spatula to mix titanium with castor oil

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 8:53 am

    Same happens to me every time when I try to mix dry pigments (FD&C, D&C, TiO2 doesn’t matter coated or not, Iron oxides) with Octyldodecanol also with a spatula. All my lipsticks look like wispa chocolate bar. It would be great to know why it happens and whether anything can be don to fix it.

  • Pharma

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 7:03 pm

    …whether anything can be don to fix it.

    Degas in an ultrasound bath ;) .
    Just received mine last week! Going to use it to degas water and try to make micro/nanoemulsions (and obviously clean my stuff). Anyway, pigments contain a lot of air and this one can gas out if the particles aren’t smashed fast enough. Mixing with a blender or similar liberates air earlier during the dispersion (also, less air is incorporated because the pigments are “sucked” slowly but continuously into the suspension) and gets displaced sooner whilst manual dispersing often leaves small crumbs and mini-bubbles on them. Hence, a later “foaming” can be observed. Dunno if my explanation is understandable???
  • saraahsan

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 7:10 pm

    @Pharma many thanks for reply. so i will consider these bubbles normal. 

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 9:47 pm

    Well bubbles are ‘normal’ but ‘not desirable for a consumer’. Pigments are challenging to work with. They either have to be coated and predisperced (read all hard job is done for you) or they are pain in the neck. Have a look at tkb trading and making cosmetics. They have predispersed TiO2. To be honest I gave up on the dry ones.

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 9:51 pm

    From a very practical point of view, if this lipstick is just for you these bubbles have no effect on the quality and the performance provided that your formula is good. But you won’t be able to mold it properly (use lipbalm tube) and you won’t be able to give it to someone as a gift.

  • saraahsan

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 9:55 pm

    @ngarayeva001 many thanks for ur guidelines. i am making lipsticks palettes i will try to use this (bubbling) titanium in making lipstick and will see the result. will update here as well. 

  • saraahsan

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 9:58 pm

    i will also buy predispersed pigments from tkb trading. i also added preservative cap-5 from tkb. but i came to know that cap-2 is for lipstick ????. i cant buy again as shipping charges are too too high. 

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 10:53 pm

    I don’t preserve my lipsticks. The reason for that, it’s an anhydrous product and it will be ok for a couple of months. I am not saying that lipsticks don’t need to be preserved but I am still learning and throw away most of the prototypes within a month. I have similar approach to all products. I use the cheapest and the easiest to get preservatives when the formula is under development.

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 11:05 pm

    That cap-5 blend is the same as cap-2 except for potassium sorbate (which is quite water soluble). The reason they say not to use it in lipstick is solubility not the harmfulness of any sort. They still say it’s dispersible. So, you should try to see whether it separates or not.

  • saraahsan

    Member
    August 19, 2019 at 11:24 pm

    @ngarayeva001 so nice of you for guiding such way. you are so supportive. i am in making of lipsticks. and also i have changed my oils as pharma suggested to switch the grapeseed oil which was causing gumming and rencid within a month. now i am on to jojoba and castor oil. lets see whats happend this time. last thing if we overheat our Lipstick base while mixing colors. can it be the reason my lisptick got sticky and smells very bad within a month.