Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating tear free baby wash tip to toe

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 8, 2018 at 8:19 pm

    The glucosides and betaine act like emulsifiers. I prefer PEG-150 (particularly crothix loquid) because you add it in the end and control thickness. You can add more until you are happy with the result. Carbopol is less predictable. Maybe I am not too experienced with surfactants but I personally find crothix easier to work with. BTW if you use anionic and amphoteric surfactants you don’t need a thickener. In this case amphoteric and non-ionic are used.

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 8, 2018 at 10:27 pm
    @ngarayeva001 You refer to PEG-150 as if it is a material. Do you know what PEG-150 refers to? Just an initial search shows PEG-150 in the name of at least 48 different raw materials used in Cosmetics.
  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 8, 2018 at 11:15 pm

    @Microformulation, thank you for correcting me. It might really sound confusing. I was talking about PEG-150  distearate:
    https://www.makingcosmetics.com/PEG-150-Distearate_p_303.html

    and  PEG-150 Pentaerythrityl Tetrastearate (Crothix Liquid by Croda).

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 9, 2018 at 12:40 am

    No problem. If you read up, the number relates to the average molecular weight of the ethoxylated compound. They are great products, but if you sell, any “natural” markets would balk at the PEG’s.

  • belassi

    Member
    September 9, 2018 at 12:57 am

    PEG-150 distearate is useful but it has its limits, typically 1.5% in a shampoo, higher than that and you get a product that’s like plastic.

  • gunther

    Member
    September 9, 2018 at 4:12 pm

    Can you use PEG-150 distearate along carbopol (to thicken sulfate-free surfactant formulations, CAPB+glucoside), and are there any advantages or disadvantages in doing so?

  • belassi

    Member
    September 9, 2018 at 5:40 pm

    You could, if you wanted to change the sensorials from short to long flow.

  • shellyco

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 8:17 am

    zaidjeber said:

    Way too much xanthan gum, oils, sodium benzoate
    Way too little surfactant (not good choice of surfactnts too)
    if you want tear free, keep the pH 7

    Hi,

    is the PH level main factor to avoid tea free shampoo or are there other ingredients that when above certain level cause tears ? If there are other ingredients, can you give please some examples ?

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 9:45 am

    No, pH isn’t the only factor you should use amphoteric surfactants to make product tear free. Obviously ingredients such as essential oils have to be either excluded at all or uses at a very low %

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 2:16 pm

    No, pH isn’t the only factor you should use amphoteric surfactants to make product tear free. Obviously ingredients such as essential oils have to be either excluded at all or uses at a very low %

    Thank you. Amphoterics are the secret. There are numerous starting Formulas on Tear-Free Baby Shampoos, especially some ones from BASF.
  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 3:37 pm

    @Microformulation I am learning:)

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 3:39 pm

    Just this week I have heard this same claim from a line assigning “tear free” to pH incorrectly. Another favorite which you will see eventually is “they add novacaine to the shampoo.” It is so much simpler and elegant in the Chemistry and the surfactant classifications.

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 30, 2018 at 6:34 pm

    Wow! It’s just beyond nonsense. I wish novocaine worked this way. Would be great for painful aesthetic procedures such as hair removal ? 

  • Max

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 12:51 am

    dear all, expect the claims you can read on labels, as any of you see a proper scientific paper (S) testing surfactants…. to support the tear free claim? Of course not the unfamous Draize test! 

  • markbroussard

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 1:20 am

    I’m surprised that anyone is still using the Draize Test (and methodology - animal testing) for tear-free claims.  Most are now done on human volunteers and evaluated by participant responses and ophthalmologist evaluation.

  • Max

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 1:26 am

    I read about many test available, but I am having hard time to find any good study to support the tear free claim. 
    I did not realize that humans were the new rabbits! LOL

  • JOJO91343

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 5:04 am

    If you, still, feel drying, there are several moisturizing agents in the Raw Material Market.  If you prefer Natural Moisturizer, you may use sodium PCA, Hyaluronic Acid, or Squalene.  This is if you like to stay away from the moisturizing Oil Blends.

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 8:51 am

    Test on humans save the rabbits! Jokes aside I agree, some things can be tested on volunteers.

  • microformulation

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 1:01 pm
    We have used HET-CAM as our standard test for ocular/corneal irritation test. http://www.mbresearch.com/hetcam.htm
  • markbroussard

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 1:47 pm

    @Max

    I don’t think you will ever find a study that will “support” the tear free claim … this is really more appropriately a “non-irritating” claim … but, when you’re eyes are subjected to an irritant, you tear to wash the irritant from the eyes.  It’s really only a matter of your test panel noticed irritancy, stinging, burning and tearing and to what degree or not.

    Rabbits, btw, do not have tear ducts … so they never were a good model.  The type of test used depends on the type of product you’re developing.

  • Max

    Member
    October 2, 2018 at 9:47 pm

    Thanks all for the valuable comments :)

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