Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating stabilizing H2O2 containing oxidant

  • stabilizing H2O2 containing oxidant

    Posted by Shaghayegh on November 17, 2023 at 6:20 am

    Hi

    I am trying to make a cheep base for a hydrogen peroxide containing oxidant (6% and 9%) used in hair bleaching and hair coloring.

    I am using a 50% hydrogen peroxide solution which seems to have some stabilizer in it which I do not know what it is. I should use 12 g of this solution to make a 6% and 18 g for 9% oxidant.

    but I do not know how to stabilize that in my formula.

    Do you have any advice for me ?

    oldman20 replied 5 months, 4 weeks ago 5 Members · 10 Replies
  • 10 Replies
  • PhilGeis

    Member
    November 17, 2023 at 6:24 am

    Yes - stop it. If you don’t know what’s in your ingredients, you should not be exposing consumers to your product.

    • Shaghayegh

      Member
      November 17, 2023 at 6:48 am

      I work for a company and it is something that I have to do .

      My boss says it must be phosphoric acid in the solution so if the pH is controlled I do not think it is harmful for the consumer????

  • PhilGeis

    Member
    November 17, 2023 at 7:46 am

    Can’t offer a risk assessment based on what your boss “thinks.” But I understand your position. Just make sure your “boss”, not you, is responsible on paper for this product.

    https://www.usptechnologies.com/what-are-h2o2-stabilizers-and-will-they-affect-my-application/

    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  PhilGeis.
    • Shaghayegh

      Member
      November 17, 2023 at 9:56 am

      ????

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    November 17, 2023 at 10:49 am

    You are compounding 10 Volume and 20 Volume developers for oxidative hair dyes here, right? Been here and done that and as @PhilGeis alludes that 50% peroxide is nasty to work with. The suppliers do not mention stabilizers they are using, just as they don’t for hypochlorite technical grades. Don’t ask me why - trade secrets maybe? Since you are simply diluting stabilizers are not the issue but your water and mixing gear certainly are. Deionization must be thorough and then you will need to add acid stable chelants like EDTA (Na2) or disodium pentetate to this. Yes, phosphoric acid (also a chelant) is recommended and peroxide is more stable at pH 5.0 or so. Finally, if you are not familiar with equipment passivation techniques, read up on it. This is essential to success and absolutely necessary if stainless steel is involved. Good luck and try not to blow anything up.

    • Graillotion

      Member
      November 17, 2023 at 2:14 pm

      @chemicalmatt Hey Matt….I’m gonna take this one WAY off course. I am a plant guru….and H2O2 is often used in plant supplementation. There is however a concern among the educated….of what is being used as stabilizers in store bought H2O2 (and the benefit…or mainly lack there of…for plants). Question….are there sources available (to the common man) that are devoid of stabilizers (talking hopefully the 3% dilution….but able to do the maths….if not) that one could use on plants….and still sleep well at night?

      Aloha

      • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Graillotion.
      • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Graillotion.
    • Shaghayegh

      Member
      November 25, 2023 at 11:06 am

      thank you for your response.

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    November 17, 2023 at 2:46 pm

    @Graillotion Aloha right back at you brother. Virtually all shelf 3.0% peroxides have stabilizers and likely these are simply chelants. I do not know where you could capture unadulterated H2O2. These days you cannot even commercially purchase more than 35% without a special permit in the USA (Shaghayegh must be elsewhere) ever since Homeland Security got involved.

    • Graillotion

      Member
      November 17, 2023 at 6:02 pm

      @chemicalmatt one more question…as this is a plant forum…right? ????

      We often spend big bucks on potting soils that contains mycorrhiza, and we also know that not all soil bacteria are bad! So typically, the use rate floats around 2-3% but also up to 12.5% of the 3% H2O2 in H2O. At this rate…are we damaging these friendly’s….or is the dilution sufficient that we would just irritate them at best? At what rate of H2O2 inclusion…are we not going to damage our friendlies?

      I have seen a plant blogger (kinda like a mommy blogger in cosmetics)…which I would consider just one step above normal plant blogger people….but does not have a Masters or PhD. She distinguished pharmaceutical grade H2O2 with food grade H2O2, and said that many times the Pharma grade is co-stabilized with silver!? Do you concur? And where the heck….does one buy food grade H2O2?

      Aloha.

      • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Graillotion.
      • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Graillotion.
  • oldman20

    Member
    December 19, 2023 at 2:17 am

    isn’t hydroperoxit not long-stable in solution? how can keep oxygen atom stable?

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