Cosmetic Science Talk

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Home Cosmetic Science Talk Cosmetic Industry Sorbitol in place of glycerine and Diethylamine in place of triethanolamine in moisturizing cream

  • bayo1214

    Member
    January 7, 2021 at 12:36 pm

    Ok thanks @ androus

  • Andraous

    Member
    January 4, 2021 at 8:19 pm

    Andraous said:

    You can use 0.15 AMP 95(2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) with 0.3 carbomer

    Carbomer 21

  • Andraous

    Member
    January 4, 2021 at 8:18 pm

    You can use 0.15 AMP 95(2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) with 0.3 carbomer

  • bayo1214

    Member
    December 29, 2020 at 10:23 am

    Thanks @chemica matt

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    December 28, 2020 at 9:11 pm

    @bayo1214 since your cream uses both stearic acid and carbomer (and I assume you mean 0.50% carbomer not 5.0%) I suggest using Tromethamine (trimethylamine, not TEA) as a neutralizer/saponifier. Works nearly the same as TEA, better than MEA, but acceptable everywhere. NaOH and DMEA will present different viscosity and emulsifying outcomes, as will arginine. See as source TrisAmino from Angus Chemical in the USA.

  • bayo1214

    Member
    December 28, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    Thanks you pharma

  • Pharma

    Member
    December 28, 2020 at 7:46 pm
    If you want a replacement for TEA, you could try dimethylethanolamine (DMEA) or arginine.
    Sorbitol is less tacky but IMHO less hydrating and more expensive. Maybe try a mixture of the two too?
  • bayo1214

    Member
    December 27, 2020 at 10:32 pm

    Thanks em88 I really appreciate

  • em88

    Member
    December 27, 2020 at 10:18 pm

    5% carbomer is way too much. What type of carbomer are you using?
    Regarding your question “Is it safe to alternate sorbitol with glycerine and DEA with TEA?”
    Sorbitol is safe, while diethylamine is a straight no! In fact, it is a banned ingredient in cosmetics in the EU countries. 
    https://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/consumer_safety/opinions/sccnfp_opinions_97_04/sccp_out144_en.htm
    https://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/consumer_safety/opinions/sccnfp_opinions_97_04/sccp_out64_en.htm
    Triethanolamine is much safer, but if you don’t have access to this ingredient, use NaOH solutions. 
    Check the pH of the cream as well.