Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating preservative mapping issues

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 6, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    Again the only reason I said PEG-100, is because it’s high HLB and the mix with Glyceryl Stearate is commonluy used. Maybe Polysorbate 80 is an option? It is high HLB and as far as I know it is used in food, so should work in a “natural” formulation.

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 6, 2018 at 6:15 pm
    @ngarayeva001 When they suggested Cocamide MEA, he went way off the reservation regarding “natural.” He would need to select another more acceptable high HLB product.
    The options are many here, but it seems as if the OP has limited availability.  It will be a matter of what is available, then what has the proper HLB and then “natural compliance.”
  • tattvas

    Member
    September 7, 2018 at 2:46 am

    thanks guys. i think i got enough ammunition to go for testing..will try polysorbates… i understand that one emulsifier should be higher and one should be lower to cover mean hlb calculated for the solution but when you try to go in natural category the list shrinks and higher hlb mostly are synthetic..we tried stearic acid and cetearyl alchohol earlier in some other same base product and it worked fine but we never check there stability beyond six months.

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 7, 2018 at 6:07 am

    Polysorbate 80 is used in food industry. Don’t know if it passes as ‘natural’ because of it but it’s definitely safe. Regarding stearic acid and cetearyl, both are thickeners. Ceteatyl is a co-emulsifier but can’t be used alone. Now, they both can contribute to an unpleasant application and make lotions ‘foam’ (white trail). To reduce this effect you have to add silicones, which will not go well with ‘natural’ claim. Cetearyl works well with polusorbate 60, but both are rather high HLB. I think you should analyze ingredients list of ‘natural’ products in the market. The more you read the better your understanding of what they use will be. But again even when you google a perfectly safe ingredient you get chemophobic articles like ‘10 worst skincare ingredients’ or ‘why you should avoid Xx in your skincare’.

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 7, 2018 at 5:02 pm
    At a minimum, a “natural” material should be plant-based minimally processed. As ethoxylated compounds, Polysorbates are avoided. Also, with the 1,4 Dioxane scare you will get some marketing pushback.
    Remember, “natural” does not equal safe. Synthetic does not equal dangerous. That is the Naturalistic fallacy.
  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    September 7, 2018 at 6:15 pm

    Yes, makes sense. I was just thinking that it would be avoided in food for the same chemophobic reasons.

  • microformulation

    Member
    September 8, 2018 at 12:10 pm
    @ngarayeva001 Food Science is a separate discipline and it is a huge cognitive dissonance to blithely lump them together. The industries have different Marketing bias, different marketing emphasis, and numerous technical differences.
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