Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating General Requests / Opportunities Need Help - Development of an Ethanol-Free Fragrance Emulsion

  • Need Help - Development of an Ethanol-Free Fragrance Emulsion

    Posted by Mattthw on February 8, 2024 at 1:48 pm

    Hi all. I’m looking for help to develop an alternative to ethanol as used in perfumes. The objective is straightforward: formulate an ethanol alternative for fragrances that is not only non-viscous and non-flammable but also environmentally friendly, skin-safe, and able to perform well with perfume oils at 20%. Although Symrise has patented a similar innovation (https://patents.google.com/patent/US8513180B2/en), I’m interested in exploring other viable pathways.

    From my limited perspective, two approaches seem feasible: 1. a water-based formulation, which raises the issue of finding suitable, non-controversial preservatives, (what Symrise did) or 2. an adjustment to the viscosity of oil-based fragrances to enable spray application without compromising on skin feel or the lack of a need for preservatives. Route 1. would likely consist of a good solvent (maybe DPG), an emulsifier (maybe Polyglyceryl Oleate), a humectant (Glycerin?), an emollient (maybe Isohexadecane), a broad spectrum preservative, and water of course. Route 2. might look differently and be a more straightforward approach with something like jojoba oil (carrier), and an agent for altering the skin feel and viscosity.

    Does anyone have any preliminary advice or know someone who would be able to help with this? To be clear, I am not a chemist, so I don’t have much of an idea of how niche of a skillset this requires. Any advice at all will be welcomed. Thanks!

    Mattthw replied 1 month ago 4 Members · 8 Replies
  • 8 Replies
  • sagestudent

    Member
    February 8, 2024 at 9:55 pm

    interested in this as well.

    not at all sure if this is helpful for you, but this is the ingredients list for j’dore

    #16455 AQUA (WATER) • PARFUM (FRAGRANCE) • BUTYLENE GLYCOL • GLYCERIN • PENTYLENE GLYCOL • CAPRYLIC/CAPRIC/SUCCINIC TRIGLYCERIDE • CITRUS AURANTIUM AMARA (BITTER ORANGE) FLOWER WATER • HYDROGENATED LECITHIN • HYDROXYCITRONELLAL • BENZYL SALICYLATE • HEXYL CINNAMAL • HYDROXYACETOPHENONE • CHLORPHENESIN • CITRONELLOL • LIMONENE • ALPHA-ISOMETHYL IONONE • TRIETHYL CITRATE • POLOXAMER 407 • SODIUM CITRATE • PHYTOSTEROLS • LINALOOL • GERANIOL • CITRIC ACID • PENTAERYTHRITYL TETRA-DI-T-BUTYL HYDROXYHYDROCINNAMATE • CINNAMYL ALCOHOL • BENZYL BENZOATE • CITRAL • BENZYL ALCOHOL • BENZYL CINNAMATE

    • Mattthw

      Member
      February 8, 2024 at 10:15 pm

      This is interesting because it looks as if it infringes on Symrise’s patent:

      (a) water; (Included in ingredients for J’Adore)

      (b) at least one vicinal diol; (J’Adore has Pentylene Glycol)

      (c) one or two solvent(s) for reducing stickiness, wherein one or two solvent(s) is/are selected from the group consisting of isobutyric acid-1-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-3-pentyl ester and isobutyric acid-3-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pentyl ester; and (J’Adore has Glycerin)

      (d) at least one odor essence.

      I wonder if Dior licensed it for this or if Symrise gave them a pass for whatever reason. Thanks for sharing, I didn’t know that Dior released an alcohol free version of this. It goes to show that it’s definitely possible given Dior and Hermetica are both using the same methods; however, I wonder if there’s another way of doing this that’s not patented. It’s really a shame that something like this can be patented in the first place but I understand the reasoning.

    • Mattthw

      Member
      February 8, 2024 at 10:34 pm

      This is interesting because it looks as if it infringes on Symrise’s patent:

      (a) water; (Included in ingredients for J’Adore)

      (b) at least one vicinal diol; (J’Adore has Pentylene Glycol)

      (c) one, two or three solvent(s) for reducing stickiness, selected from the group consisting of glycerol, isobutyric acid-1-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-3-pentyl ester (compound of formula (1)) and isobutyric acid-3-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pentyl ester (compound of formula (2)) and; (J’Adore has Glycerin)

      (d) at least one odor essence.

      I wonder if Dior licensed it for this or if Symrise gave them a pass for whatever reason. Thanks for sharing, I didn’t know that Dior released an alcohol free version of this. It goes to show that it’s definitely possible given Dior and Hermetica are both using the same methods; however, I wonder if there’s another way of doing this that’s not patented. It’s really a shame that something like this can be patented in the first place but I understand the reasoning.

  • sagestudent

    Member
    February 9, 2024 at 2:49 pm

    SUPER quick phone reply

    Love your thinking - I feel like Dior is probably Symrise flagship client but this is the opinion of lil nobody me.

    Reason I’m updating this thread -

    Saw this in December and was reminded of it today: (see attachment - can’t paste easily from phone)

    From the branding dept: “Proprietary formulation that blends water and oil seamlessly and lasts just as long as alcohol-based perfumes, absorbing quickly and cleanly into the skin.”

    • Mattthw

      Member
      February 9, 2024 at 2:57 pm

      Definitely interesting. Which fragrance is this? Looks like they’re using some different ingredients but still seem to be using the vicinal diol + glycerol approach.

  • JGSG

    Member
    February 19, 2024 at 9:29 pm

    As a nanoencapsulation startup, we utilize a biodegradable polymer to encapsulate various actives, including fine fragrance ingredients. One product idea is a pre-manufactured biodegradable ‘nanocapsules’ which is in the form of polymer dispersion in water. Customers simply add their fine fragrance/essential oils blend & stir with magnetic stirrer, resulting in a milky white sprayable water-based alcohol-free perfume with up to 20-30% fragrance concentration. The skin feel is non-sticky with minimal polymer and no surfactant. Advantages include suitability for sensitive and allergic skin, and a longer-lasting, uniform scent compared to alcohol-based perfumes.

    Just wondering would the perfume DIY community desire such a product? Let’s say it will cost about $2-4 extra to produce a 100ml 20% perfume bottle but you save on the alcohol.
    Welcome any feedback !

    • clairel

      Member
      May 12, 2024 at 10:55 am

      Hello, Are you still working on this from a perfume/ fragrance perspective. I’m base in the UK and would like to create a range of non-alcoholic fragrances - containing both natural oils, absolutes as well as sustainably produced aroma chemicals. No petrochemicals. I see your encapsulation mentions its biodegradable is it also from biobased renewables / (plant/ fungi/ algae) ? Thanks Claire

    • Mattthw

      Member
      May 15, 2024 at 12:24 pm

      This definitely sounds interesting. Can you please share more information with me at matt@refynefragrances.com?

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