Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Melting Beads in an Anhydrous Formulation

  • Melting Beads in an Anhydrous Formulation

    Posted by Madison on January 15, 2019 at 2:45 pm

    I am having a very hard time finding a raw material that I need to recreate a product that my employers are interested in duplicating. They seem to be colorless spherical beads of some material, that melt after being rubbed onto the skin after some time. 
    The ingredients are as follows:
    Lanolin
    Butyspermum Parkii (Shea) Butter
    Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter
    Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil
    Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate
    Ricinus Communis (castor) Seed Oil
    Simmonsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil
    Sodium Bicarbonate
    Aroma/Flavour

    I am quite certain the base that they use is anhydrous lanolin. I thought that the beads were most likely a mixture of shea and cocoa butter but I cannot find any supplier that offers them here in the US, and I also thought Coconut Oil beads would melt far too easily if they were even available. I then moved on to considering jojoba beads but every supplier has mentioned that they will not melt when rubbed on skin. Am I missing something very obvious? I have searched google and ULProspector for anything I could think of in terms of beads. 

    doreen replied 5 years, 1 month ago 4 Members · 8 Replies
  • 8 Replies
  • belassi

    Member
    January 15, 2019 at 4:36 pm
  • Madison

    Member
    January 15, 2019 at 7:19 pm

    Yes that is what I am trying to recreate. I can’t find out what the beads are comprised of. 

  • Madison

    Member
    January 15, 2019 at 7:19 pm

    The raw material that I am trying to find would be the beads/spherical balls that are in Dripfit. 

  • belassi

    Member
    January 15, 2019 at 9:59 pm

    (Phone rings at Dripfit HQ)
    “Hello? Dripfit? Can I talk to someone about product safety? You see, my little girl poured all my Dripfit cream into the sink. And the sink is now clogged with all these little beads. What are they? Will they eventually dissolve?”

  • belassi

    Member
    January 15, 2019 at 10:09 pm

    Might be Kerabead. Or could be shea butter beads. 

  • Madison

    Member
    January 16, 2019 at 12:43 pm

    I like the way you think! Thank you for the suggestion. :) 

  • ozgirl

    Member
    January 16, 2019 at 9:18 pm
    It is possible that they are not meant to be there and are just recrystallised shea butter?
    Shea butter regularly forms grains when used in anhydrous products.

  • doreen

    Member
    January 17, 2019 at 1:29 pm

    I’ve bought a hand sanitizer with jojoba beads a while ago, but the jojoba beads did melt after a while when rubbed.

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