Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating General Is minimal chemical in sunscreen make it efficacious?

  • Is minimal chemical in sunscreen make it efficacious?

    Posted by drjaysee on January 28, 2024 at 9:06 am

    Zinc oxide and Titanium dioxide are required chemicals in mineral sunscreen formulation. I want to know, these two alone are efficient to protect UV rays? or according you, which another chemical should be added to get maximum benefits?

    once I have read formulators opinions about ‘Minimalist’ in this forum and many agreed in ‘Minimalist’.

    so want to know to keep sunscreen lotion minimal with above mentioned chemical in alovera gel base ,give a proper protection?

    please give me your opinion to get best result.

    @Perry44 @PhilGeis @ketchito

    PhilGeis replied 1 month ago 5 Members · 14 Replies
  • 14 Replies
  • microformulation

    Member
    January 28, 2024 at 9:27 am

    It’s unlikely that you would keep the ZnO and TiO2 suspended in just an Aloe Vera Gel, resulting in inconsistent coverage.

    • drjaysee

      Member
      January 29, 2024 at 3:09 am

      thank you

      but what are important factors for formulation of sunscreen?

      • microformulation

        Member
        January 29, 2024 at 9:58 am

        As many have said, a “minimalistic” approach would be ineffective. Sunscreens are drugs and multiple ingredients contribute to the Drug Benefits. I would do some involved reading as it is more involved of a topic than the Forum could effectively cover. We have Professional Seminars dedicated to just these products.

        • drjaysee

          Member
          January 30, 2024 at 2:58 am

          Thanks a lot!

  • PhilGeis

    Member
    January 28, 2024 at 9:37 am

    Sunscreen development should pursue efficacy rather than minimalist concept. Variations in usage , stability, manufacturing will have a “just enough” formula leaving some users with insufficient protection.

    • drjaysee

      Member
      January 29, 2024 at 3:05 am

      @PhilGeis , Thanks for your valuable suggestion. But I want to know where some brand as ORDINARY give formulation with minimal ingredients to achieve good skin care or dealing with aging, pigmentation vise versa. whereas I have found these two mineral ingredients which protect skin from UVA &UVB rays by reflecting action from skin surface so why cant we use this alone with our other skincare formulas?

      I also have read, some sunscreen brand use ant irritants to dealt with skin damage by UV rays so these kind of sunscreen more harmful as their damage cant measured under the effect of anti irritant as allantoin etc.

      so please help me to clear doubts.

      • PhilGeis

        Member
        January 29, 2024 at 5:25 am

        Cosmetic claims are generally hype so minimalist approaches(fairy dust addition) are common. If I understand, you ask why not use a small amount of the sunscreens as it could have some effect and prob can’t hurt. Maybe - but you can’t do this in the US. It shows intent to achieve a drug effect thatbwould require approval by NDA or compliance to the relevant monoograph.

        The oxides are not inert - simply reflecting light energy. The absorb light energy to form free radicals that might provoked irritation.

        • drjaysee

          Member
          January 30, 2024 at 3:10 am

          @PhilGeis Your answer cleared some doubts. Thanks a lot!

          I have read some articles and you are the first one who told me, oxides can generate free radicles.

          Just I want to know, In a formulation, we use one ingredient to target a purpose and and if, this one dealing that purpose with some other adverse effect so we can use any other ingredient to counteract this adverse effect. Similarly which ingredient we can use to minimize the effect of free radicles.

          Thanks again!

  • Perry44

    Administrator
    January 28, 2024 at 7:35 pm

    Zinc oxide & titanium oxide (as a blend) can be the basis for sunscreen actives. But as @PhilGeis says, formulating them should focus on efficacy, not on minimalism. These are drugs in the US and it’s important to create functional products that have been tested for efficacy.

  • ketchito

    Member
    January 29, 2024 at 1:40 pm

    I agree with all the comments. Unfortunately, mineral (inorganic) sunblockers don’t actually reach the same level of protection than if you use organic filters. Keep in mind also that both inorganic filter’s main Mode of action is by absorbing UV rays (same as with organic filters). In my experience, mixing both organic and inorganic filters, along with antioxidants and other radical stabilizers, and a good emollient system to give better spreading/coverage, is a good base for a sunblocker. But as previously mentioned, there’s a lot of knowledge needed to get to a good performing and safe formula.

    • drjaysee

      Member
      January 30, 2024 at 3:13 am

      Thanks a lot for valuable suggestions, ketchito😊

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