Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Foundation’s oxidation - is it really happens?

  • Foundation’s oxidation - is it really happens?

    Posted by pma on December 8, 2013 at 6:57 pm

    A lot of consumers say the foundation X oxidizes on the skin, changing its initial color among the day. Is it really happens? Or it’s more one cosmetic myth? 

    pma replied 10 years, 5 months ago 4 Members · 7 Replies
  • 7 Replies
  • OldPerry

    Member
    December 9, 2013 at 9:53 am

    I vote Cosmetic Myth.  Unless they are including DHA in their foundation.

  • pma

    Member
    December 9, 2013 at 6:47 pm

    TKS Perry, but I meant the pigments on the skin, not the skin per se…

  • Chemist77

    Member
    December 10, 2013 at 12:17 am

    Maybe some light sensitive pigments which oxidize in the sunlight and the skin acting as the base and catalyst both for such color change, purely a guess so discretion advised. 

  • OldPerry

    Member
    December 10, 2013 at 10:07 am

    It seems that if the product did change color throughout the day that would be a major stability problem.  I still vote myth.  However, it is possible I suppose.

  • beautysci

    Member
    December 10, 2013 at 6:54 pm

    I think this happens when the pigments (TiO2 + iron oxides) have not been completely developed/extended, because of poor dispersing, and when the liquid foundation mixes with the oils in your skin it will further develop/extend the color and make your foundation look darker. I have very oily skin and I find that most liquid foundations tend to look darker throughout the day on me. To avoid this, use liquid foundations that have the pigments fully extended. Fully extended dispersions are the trick in my opinion. 

  • Chemist77

    Member
    December 11, 2013 at 12:07 am

    I guess the original query was about oxidation and more like a chemical phenomenon and if the pigments are not properly dispersed or change complexion on application then it is more of a physical process as the pigments are getting milled and the tint changes from a half milled to fully milled and bloomed. 

    But the original question was that given all the conditions have been satisfied, is there a chance that the pigments are going to change chemically on the skin and then change the tint?????
  • pma

    Member
    December 11, 2013 at 6:28 am

    “(…) when the liquid foundation mixes with the oils in your skin it will further develop/extend the color and make your foundation look darker (…)”


    The darkened of the skin’s oil is interesting. In Asia, where darkening is a big no-no for consumers and consumers notice even the slightest color change of the skin, the cleansers usually remove a lot of oil - to give an instantly “whitening effect”. This guy showed how a basic soap can instantly offer a “whitening” effect - probably the most desired cosmetic effect in many Asian countries:


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