Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating General Ingredient(s) to Replace Glycerin in O/W Cream?

  • Ingredient(s) to Replace Glycerin in O/W Cream?

    Posted by spadirect on December 30, 2018 at 10:19 pm

    What ingredient(s) could function as replacement(s) for glycerin in an O/W cream?

    Considering the functions of glycerin in an O/W cream, what alternatives to glycerin could provide similar performance and functionality?

    Thanks!

    Microformulation replied 5 years, 6 months ago 12 Members · 35 Replies
  • 35 Replies
  • Microformulation

    Member
    December 30, 2018 at 11:07 pm
    There are certainly loads of materials that have the same sort of activity (humectant). It is a whole class so to post a comprehensive list is not feasible.
    The big question is why? Glycerin is effective, not sticky if used at the right levels, easily obtained and universally accepted under every credible “natural standard.” Could I replace my ground beef with air aged ground Kobi Beef? Yes, it would still feed me but cost significantly more.
  • Dtdang

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 2:09 pm

    Hyalauric acid attracts water from air to skin more than glycerin 100 times or more

  • gld010

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 2:16 pm

    70% Sorbitol solution. I agree with Microformulation though, glycerin is cheap and considered “natural” so there is no reason to not use it unless specifically requested (I’ve had a few odd “no glycerin” requests but it’s not the norm, even for “natural” brands)

  • MarkBroussard

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 2:52 pm

    There’s the “No Glycols” segment of the natural community that @Spadirect might be catering to … this includes Glycerin as one of their targets.

    Sorbitol, Sodium PCA, Betaine … lots of options here as substitutes for glycerin.

  • Microformulation

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 3:09 pm
    I have had clients request “No glycols” also. They really couldn’t say why except that they kept seeing “Glycol free” online.
  • spadirect

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 9:18 pm

    I have no objection to glycerin (or glycols) at all.  I am aware that it performs its humectant function just fine in 100s of thousands of products.  I know it is relatively cheap and can be easily found derived from 100% bio-based feedstocks.

    I was just curious if there were any replacements that might perform the same functions with equal or better performance.  Of course, cost will always be an important consideration as well.

    If costs be damned, what are the names of some of the better performing humectants in the long list of ingredients that could function as legitimate replacements for glycerin (aside from the kindly aforementioned 70% sorbitol solution and hyaluronic acid)?

    Thanks again!

  • MarkBroussard

    Member
    December 31, 2018 at 11:53 pm

    Yes, the aforementioned Hyaluronic Acid, Sodium Lactate or Sodium PCA if you want performance somewhat superior to Glycerin.  You should also take a look at Saccharide Isomerate or Betaine (an osmolyte).  Hyaluronic Acid will be the best, but also the most expensive, by quite a bit relative to the others.

  • Doreen

    Member
    January 1, 2019 at 4:25 pm

    So now polyols are targeted as well? Pffff… unbelievable.

    Oh of course! Because they’re used in anti-freeze!!! How can we put that on our skins!!!!  :#

  • EVchem

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 12:33 pm

    If you’re just looking for new marketing angles, we often use Pentavitin  which has Saccharide Isomerate or Prodew 600 which has natural moisturizing factor amino acids and betaine. 

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 2:42 pm

    @Doreen, they found a new victim.

    https://helloglow.co/ingredients-to-avoid-in-makeup-and-skincare-products/ 

    Retinol causes cancer now :) I guess I will die soon.

  • Microformulation

    Member
    January 2, 2019 at 8:33 pm
  • Doreen

    Member
    January 3, 2019 at 7:58 am

    @ngarayeva001
    And of course parabens are in bold an extra big letters! :joy:

  • Jdawgswife76

    Member
    January 3, 2019 at 6:58 pm

    I see your simple question has turned into yet another debate.  Yrs there are several others to ANSWER your question!  The sodium lactate,  hyaluronic, Sodium Pca,  Propylene and Butylene Glycol,  Sorbitaol,  Allintoin, etc.  Researching the different  humectants will give you more of what your looking for and your reasoning for wanting something other than glycerin in your formula. So we are clear as the reasoning and NOT asuming,  is there a specific reason you want to use something other than glycerin? 

  • Jdawgswife76

    Member
    January 3, 2019 at 6:59 pm

    Pardon my spell ✅ on my phone! 

  • Microformulation

    Member
    January 3, 2019 at 7:35 pm
    Keep in mind that this thread will be referred to by others in the search functions. There is no requirement that it stay on task.  The group is also building a knowledge base.
  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    January 3, 2019 at 11:28 pm

    Sodium PCA /Sodium Lactate + polymers =>goodbye viscosity.

  • spadirect

    Member
    January 4, 2019 at 1:11 am

    @Jdawgswife76 I am not looking specifically to eliminate glycerin from a formula.  I am just curious to learn about as many options as possible.

    Thanks to all for the suggestions!

  • amitvedakar

    Member
    January 4, 2019 at 5:54 am
    one material (PURASAL MOISTXS) claim to contains Sodium Lactate+Sodium gluconate. anybody had worked with this material or have any idea?
    I want to use this in my moisturizing cream.
     
  • em88

    Member
    January 4, 2019 at 2:56 pm

    Sodium PCA /Sodium Lactate + polymers =>goodbye viscosity.

    Not all polimers behave the same, but I did face that issue many times. 

  • ngarayeva001

    Member
    January 4, 2019 at 3:43 pm

    @em88, the most robust polymers I have experience with are Sepimax Zen and Sodium Polyacrylate. They both lose viscosity even with low level of Sodim PCA. Do you know any polymer that doesn’t?

  • Doreen

    Member
    January 5, 2019 at 3:55 pm

    @ngarayeva001
    I didn’t have issues with PCA and Zen?

  • Dr Catherine Pratt

    Member
    January 6, 2019 at 5:39 am

    @Spadirect don’t know if anyone has used this one, Zemea Propanediol, it allegedly has many benefits over glycerin? and can be called Natural.

  • Microformulation

    Member
    January 6, 2019 at 7:20 pm
    There are now plant derived versions of Pentylene Glycol from Minasolve.
    Nothing can be called “natural” since it isn’t a defined term.
  • Dr Catherine Pratt

    Member
    January 7, 2019 at 12:34 am

    @Microformulation so if its not scheduled then you can use it all you like. Who said you cannot use it?

  • em88

    Member
    January 7, 2019 at 10:51 am

    @em88, the most robust polymers I have experience with are Sepimax Zen and Sodium Polyacrylate. They both lose viscosity even with low level of Sodim PCA. Do you know any polymer that doesn’t?

    I must say, Seppic products are amazing, but expensive. 
    They use “Sodium Acrylate/Sodium Acryloyldimethyltaurate Copolymer” which seems to be very stable. I’ll look around if I can get my hands on that gelling agent.
    I haven’t had much luck with sodium polyacrylate, still a great gelling product. 
    Cellulose based polymers have been stable when I  have used them in the past. 

    As per this thread, d-panthenol is an other alternative not mentioned here. 

Page 1 of 2

Log in to reply.