Ceramides

Hey guys,


Does anyone know where I can buy reasonably priced ceramides? I have looked on all the major U.S supplier such as Making Cosmetics etc, and they are just too pricey. Does anyone have a contact or larger sale company that might be willing to sell me a smaller amount?

Tagged:

Comments

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Ceramides, at least real ceramides, are always expensive. You might find synthetic derivatives or "look-alikes" for a lower price.
  • I have been looking for a scientific proof of skin benefits provided by topically applied ceramides for a while but all existing studies are not solid enough. I raised a topic here but several professional chemists pointed out on not so reliable methods used in those studies (vehicle with petrolatum). I would be happy to find such a proof because I really like ceramides/cholesterol blend sold by makingcosmetics. Maybe it’s placebo but I can swear I feel the difference..
    @Lindsey1009, I believe makingcosmetics sell repackaged Evonik ceramides. Lotioncrafter sells chinese version (same blend with cholesterol) and it’s more affordable. I didn’t notice much difference. Looks identical (rheology, overall look).
  • I have been looking for a scientific proof of skin benefits provided by topically applied ceramides for a while but all existing studies are not solid enough. I raised a topic here but several professional chemists pointed out on not so reliable methods used in those studies (vehicle with petrolatum). I would be happy to find such a proof because I really like ceramides/cholesterol blend sold by makingcosmetics. Maybe it’s placebo but I can swear I feel the difference..
    @Lindsey1009, I believe makingcosmetics sell repackaged Evonik ceramides. Lotioncrafter sells chinese version (same blend with cholesterol) and it’s more affordable. I didn’t notice much difference. Looks identical (rheology, overall look).
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5955631/

    From what I have read, they can really make a difference in your skin. Especially with someone suffering from a weakened moisture barrier. It would just be nice if I could find an affordable option.
  • "Use of the ceramide cream in this study resulted in a 100-percent improvement in IGA scores and a 67-percent improvement in overall subject skin self-assessment scores after four weeks of use in individuals with atopic dermatitis or other sensitive skin conditions. Improvements were statistically significant." 


  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Lindsey1009

    "These data demonstrate that a proprietary combination of ceramide PC-104, palmitamide MEA, glycerrhetinic acid, and grape seed extract in a glycerin, dimethicone, and petrolatum vehicle was effective in reducing the signs and symptoms of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis and other types of pruritic dermatoses (e.g., senile itch, cosmetic intolerance syndrome) in children and adults."

    In my view this is a pretty terrible study if they were looking to prove that ceramides were responsible for doing anything. It doesn't prove that at all.

    Ignoring the small sample size (50 people), the test method only looked at with treatment vs without treatment.  The treatment contained ceramides but also other things including known moisturizers like Glycerin, Dimethicone, and Petrolatum. 

    The only thing this study can be used to prove is that applying a lotion to an affected area of atopic dermatitis was beneficial.  You cannot conclude from this that the Ceramides had anything to do with the benefit.

    If they wanted to show Ceramides specifically had a benefit, they would have treated 2 sites.  One site with a cream that had ceramides and another site that had a cream that did not have ceramides.  Then they could compare the difference. 

    This would have been such a simple test design and it would have been extremely persuasive if done this way and the results were in favor of ceramides. The fact that it wasn't suggests to me that they probably didn't get good results so they didn't want to report that.  

    I suspect the study was funded by the makers of NeoCera™ who obviously have a stake in demonstrating their product is effective & remaining ignorant to whether the data supports other explanations.

    You could just as easily conclude from this study that Petrolatum, in combination with some other vehicle ingredients, was useful for treating atopic dermatitis. 

  • The vehicle contained petrolatum. Exactly the study I was referring to. Glycerin and petrolatum is probably the best one can do to their skin. And although I really want to substantiate my positive bias about ceramides, even in case with my personal experience the results I noticed are most probably due to petrolatum which I add to all my skincare, including lipbalms.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Yes, this "study" is quite laughable ... 

    What the study does indicate is that using the cream is better than using nothing at all.  I don't think they were testing specifically for the ceramide per-se, but for the combination of a specific synthetic ceramide coupled with PEA and the plant extracts which all happen to be ingredients in NeoCera cream.

    The fact that the study was conducted in a clinician's private practice screams Corporate Funded Study.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
Sign In or Register to comment.