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Home Cosmetic Science Talk Formulating Galactoarabinan as rheology additive

  • Galactoarabinan as rheology additive

    Posted by chemicalmatt on January 3, 2023 at 3:10 pm

    Has anybody in the forum had experience using galactoarabinan, called arabinogalactan in some quarters? Allegedly diminishes micelle size in o/w emulsions contributing to stability, SPF boost in sun-care, color deposition in hair dying. Does not appear to be expensive and is All Natural all day also. Somehow under-utilized or under-appreciated by the formulators and the Greenies. Why is this so?  Electrolyte tolerant? Dispersion quality? Anything? Discuss.

    Abdullah replied 4 months, 4 weeks ago 5 Members · 13 Replies
  • 13 Replies
  • MarkBroussard

    Professional Chemist / Formulator
    January 3, 2023 at 3:25 pm

    @chemicalmatt:

    Yes, I use it in multiple products, especially AHA Serums … helps enhance TEWL and lowers the irritation potential of AHA’s.  It is not useful as a rheology modifier … does not enhance viscosity even at 2% to 3%.

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    January 3, 2023 at 4:44 pm

    @MarkBroussard, thanks for the feedback. I’ll keep that constraint in mind. It is electrolyte tolerant then if compatible with AHA. Good to know.

  • Pharma

    Member
    January 3, 2023 at 5:50 pm
    I’ve tried out LaraCare A200… and couldn’t see/feel anything happening. It requires quite high inclusion rates and then results in a weird skin feel. Arabinogalactans (galactan chains with arabinose branches) are the main constituent for example of gum arabic. The larch tree derived galactoarabinan is part of the tree’s hemicellulose, doesn’t resemble any gum, and doesn’t affect viscosity. That it reduces micelle size and the film forming property were reasons why I’ve tried it out. Alas, I don’t know if it does so or not (I don’t have access neither to a Zetasizer nor a skin humidity sensor ;( ). Feel and chemistry wise, I do have my doubts that it can reduce TEWL… I would have guessed the opposite. In my case, it did hamper the initial emulsification process and I needed to add it afterwards (which is totally stupid cause then, it can’t reduce micelle size as effectively). Maybe it was just my formulations and it works great with others… I think it has a similar effect on emulsions than bentonite but with a less visible viscosity increase and requires quite high inclusion rates.
    You may market galactoarabinans also as prebiotics (that they are prebiotics only for the intestinal flora doesn’t need to appear in the marketing blurb).
    @MarkBroussard Thanks for the AHA tip. At least I know what to do with the remaining sample.
  • Abdullah

    Entrepreneur
    January 4, 2023 at 2:54 am

    @Pharma does reducing micelle size increase the stability of emulsion or decrease it? 

    Will decreased micelles size mean we will need more emulsifier? 

  • Pharma

    Member
    January 4, 2023 at 5:37 am

    @Abdullah Usually, smaller micelles means higher stability (but uniformity is as important). Smaller particles result in a larger surface area and that also means that more emulsifier molecules are located within the interphase. If, in a particular case, one really has to use more emulsifier is a different story.

  • zetein

    Member
    January 4, 2023 at 9:12 am

    Would it cause color change?

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    January 4, 2023 at 9:27 pm

    @Pharma, thanks for your insights. This helps me understand why the material never found mass appeal. Perhaps galactoarabinan works best when used in synergy with another polymer like so many do? I’ll check it out. 

  • Abdullah

    Entrepreneur
    January 5, 2023 at 2:26 am

    Pharma said:

    @Abdullah Usually, smaller micelles means higher stability (but uniformity is as important). Smaller particles result in a larger surface area and that also means that more emulsifier molecules are located within the interphase. If, in a particular case, one really has to use more emulsifier is a different story.

    What factors has influence on micelles size and makes them smaller in an emulsion? 

  • chemicalmatt

    Member
    January 5, 2023 at 7:48 pm

    @Abdullah the answer to that question would entail a multi-hour seminar on the topic, one going into the weeds in physical chemistry. No short answer here.

  • Abdullah

    Entrepreneur
    January 6, 2023 at 2:09 am

    @Abdullah the answer to that question would entail a multi-hour seminar on the topic, one going into the weeds in physical chemistry. No short answer here.

    Do you recommend any book to study for that?

  • MarkBroussard

    Professional Chemist / Formulator
    January 6, 2023 at 12:28 pm

    @Pharma, thanks for your insights. This helps me understand why the material never found mass appeal. Perhaps galactoarabinan works best when used in synergy with another polymer like so many do? I’ll check it out. 

    @chemicalmatt

    I usually pair it up with Hyaluronic Acid in AHA serums.

  • Pharma

    Member
    January 6, 2023 at 7:52 pm

    Abdullah said:

    What factors has influence on micelles size and makes them smaller in an emulsion? 

    Which factors? Basically everything you add to an emulsion, how/when you add them, and how you process it.
    What makes them smaller? Besides everything (which can also make them bigger or longer and any whatever form), the main factor which makes them small is energy. This may come from high sheer or pressure, ultrasound… Lower energy strategies involve PIT and PIC emulsification.
    Where to start? Stevenabbott.co.uk is nice and free lecture with tons of useful information (if you’re willing to go into detail and sciency stuff). It’s not a guide on ingredients and doesn’t give you formulations, but tools ;) .
  • Abdullah

    Entrepreneur
    January 7, 2023 at 9:01 am

    Pharma said:

    Abdullah said:

    What factors has influence on micelles size and makes them smaller in an emulsion? 

    Which factors? Basically everything you add to an emulsion, how/when you add them, and how you process it.
    What makes them smaller? Besides everything (which can also make them bigger or longer and any whatever form), the main factor which makes them small is energy. This may come from high sheer or pressure, ultrasound… Lower energy strategies involve PIT and PIC emulsification.
    Where to start? Stevenabbott.co.uk is nice and free lecture with tons of useful information (if you’re willing to go into detail and sciency stuff). It’s not a guide on ingredients and doesn’t give you formulations, but tools ;) .

    Thanks a lot