Glycol Stearate in anhydrous formulation?

dmh0023dmh0023 Member
edited January 2014 in Formulating
I have glycol stearate for purposes of pearlizing. Is there any way to incorporate it into an anhydrous oil formulation? Or does it need to be mixed with water? If it won't work in just oil, do you know of another pearlizing agent that does?

Cheers!

Comments

  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Why don't you make a slurry of normal pearls in one of the oils of your formula and use it, lipsticks and lipglosses are anhydrous and richly pearlized.
    Or (not sure about this one) use the glycol stearate with an emulsifier in your formula, btw what is the composition? Accordingly choose the emulsifier.
  • Thank you for the reply! Sorry for the newb question, but how do I make a slurry of pearls in an oil? If I could do that, and avoid this whole combining emulsifier mess, that would be awesome. I currently use cromollient alone as the emulsifier in my formula. at about 8% to 10%. How would I combine the glycol stearate with the cromollient - heat both, combine and blend thoroughly? 
  • chemicalmattchemicalmatt Member, Professional Chemist
    dmh0023, GMS will not form any pearlescence without emulsifying in water, so an anhydrous pearl isn't going to happen that way. If you've got to have that pearly appearance, and your formula has no water, just add one of the many pretty mica blends (aka "glitter") and be sure to suspend it well.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Just to satisfy my curiosity, why do you have an emulsifier in an anhydrous product at all?

    Another point, product names usually mean something. When you see an ending of "mollient" that's a very good indication that it's an emollient, and not a surfactant. What is it? 
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    @Bobz I think the best option for him/her is to use pearl pigments from BASF, Merck, Geotech, Engelhard (was taken over) and so on and so forth. Glycol stearate can completely be eliminated and especially since its an anhydrous product.
    But I am still unaware what is the product.
  • Hi guys. Sorry for the delay! The product is an oil cleanser. Basically a blend of different vegetable oils and an emulsifier (cromollient) that causes the oils to rinse off the face easily. 

    I would LOVE to suspend mica in the cleanser, but it all floats to the bottom after a few hours. :( I actually posted a topic a couple weeks ago about that, but couldn't find a resolution. I couldn't figure out what to use as a suspending agent since the product has no water. 

    I received some liquid lecithin recently so will be playing around with that. But yea, I'm trying to achieve a mica/pearly look and so far have been continually defeated, haha. 
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Just to let you know - Cromollient is a brand name - it's like saying Ford. There are at least 6 different Cromollient chemicals, each with different properties. We won't ever know how to help you much if you don't tell us which one you're using.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    have you tried fumed silica or hydrophobically modified fumed silica (e.g. Aerosil, ex Evonik/Degussa)?
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
Sign In or Register to comment.