stick Deodorants

SabaSaba Member
edited January 10 in Formulating
 I read about adding sodium bicarbonate to a Deodorant is not good, or it causes sensitivity ! I made one with sodium bicarbonate and it was good and I added all natural ingredients. My question is for marketing point is it really bad to add sodium bicarbonate, if this is true, can anyone suggest an alternative, please. I also added arrowroot and oils and butters. If I add zinc ricinrolate, I believe it is still considered natural, right?  Thanks  

Comments

  • Well...I think this is an example of someone seeing a box of this in grandma's fridge, and trying to get some mileage out of that aspect on the marketing side.

    On the actually deodorant side...I see two negatives (and no positives).  One, it will irritate a certain percentage of possible clients.

    More importantly, it is counterintuitive to what you are trying to produce.  It raises pH, when you are looking to lower pH.

    I may market a deo soon, and one of my BIG marketing points will be...that it does NOT include this ingredient.  Just depends on which group you are target marketing.

    Arrowroot is a good ingredient...but would never consider them interchangeable.  They do different things.
  • Baking soda is used in some toothpastes as a mild abrasive. And, some people use baking soda to clean their showers due to it being mildly abrasive.  So...a mild abrasive in the armpit DOES bother some people. Not everyone, but some. 
  • chemicalmattchemicalmatt Member, Professional Chemist
    Have to agree with @Graillotion here. Forget the arrowroot too. (Don't know how that trend got started.) Best alternate is rice starch, and just about any zinc salt: ricinoleate, gluconate, citrate. The last two are the under-rated and less expensive ones. Zn ricinoleate seems to get all the love. 

  • What about Hydroxypropyl Cyclodextrin? Would this have any effect in a stick deodorant? (Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin is a cyclic polysaccharide that is the deodorant ingredient in Febreeze, which traps VOCs within the ring structure).

    With respect to baking soda, I thought the odor neutralizing effect was actually from its alkalinity— because odors tend to be acidic—but that is also the source of irritation potential.
    ⚠️ I have a lot of ideas, but not much experience! Please keep this in mind when reading my suggestions. ⚠️
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited January 18
    Mayday said:
    What about Hydroxypropyl Cyclodextrin? Would this have any effect in a stick deodorant? (Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin is a cyclic polysaccharide that is the deodorant ingredient in Febreeze, which traps VOCs within the ring structure).

    With respect to baking soda, I thought the odor neutralizing effect was actually from its alkalinity— because odors tend to be acidic—but that is also the source of irritation potential.
    I think if the focus of a deo is capturing the malodor after it has been created, it is like closing the barn door, after the cows have gotten out.

    I think the worst possible scent in the world is, when you go into a bathroom after someone has destroyed it, and then they try and cover it with an aerosol fragrance.  No one is tricked.  I think creating a deo with this model...is like celebrating the 'Emperors New Clothes'.

    So, in deodorant, I think grand success can only be attained with the initial prevention of the malodor, not trying to trap or mask it after you allowed the bugs to create it.  For a stellar product, you must control the bugs and not allow them to produce the odor to begin with.

    I have worked in conjunction with two chemists from this forum, to create a product, that I view as very effective, and the entire focus was on not allowing the bugs that cause malodor, a foothold in the armpit biome.  There is nothing in the formula that 'catches' stink.  Just things that make life rough on the pesky stink creators.

    Aloha.
  •  Forget the arrowroot too. (Don't know how that trend got started.) Best alternate is rice starch, 

    Ok @chemicalmatt, you dictated my whole evening to researching rice starch.  I learned:

    It has the smallest particle size of the commonly used starches.
    It is used as an adhesive in museums.
    3V Sigma....sells rice starch...  :D
    Rice starch is dang expensive....do you sell small (like 1 kg) MOQ?
    A few other things...but that is what sticks in my mind at this late hour.

    Would you be willing to elaborate on the rice starch, and what aspects make it a good (deo) choice?  Please also consider the deo product I am making is an emulsified cream....as stick products just inflame the heck out of my pits.

    The concept is bug elimination, not malodor masking/trapping.

    My initial thought of using arrowroot was more about haptics, than trying to be a drying agent.

    Thank you in advance Matt, as many of your comments have made it into my formulas.
  •  Best alternate is rice starch 

    Hey Matt...is the 3V rice starch, which is sourced from Italy.....actually a Risotto starch?

    One of my brilliant advisors picked up on that Italian sourcing...and wondered if Risotto does not have a higher gelling temp (than typical rice).
Sign In or Register to comment.