Critique my niacinamide moisturizer? BTMS, Floraesters, Cholesterol..

Ingredient Name%Phase
Distilled Water72.2Water
Glycerin (Vegetable)4.5Water
Niacinamide
3.0Water
Floraesters K-20W1.5Water
Allantoin0.3Water
Xanthan Gum0.3Water
Glycolic Acidq.sWater
Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride5.0Oil
BTMS-254.0Oil
Safflower Seed Oil (High Linoleic)3.0Oil
DuraQuench IQ SA (Cetyl alcohol, Isostearyl Isostearate, Potassium Cetyl Phosphate, Cetyl stearate, Stearic Acid)2.5Oil
Spectrastat G2 N (Caprylhydroxamic Acid, Glyceryl Caprylate, Glycerin) -OR-
Spectrastat OEL (Caprylhydroxamic acid, Caprylyl glycol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Propanediol)
1.2Oil
Dimethicone CPS10001.0Oil
Cholesterol1.0Oil
Vitamin E, Mixed Tocopherols 50%0.5Oil

Looking to make a relatively cheap to manufacture, sleek whole body moisturizer for year-round general use that gives long lasting moisturization and TEWL reduction with relatively low viscosity that's beneficial for acneic skin. Considered Lotionpro 165 instead of BTMS, but prefer the latter's sleek skin feel.

Initially I toyed around with using individual ceramides and linoleic acid in its FFA form, but some studies show these ingredients causing problems and the evidence for them isn't overwhelming, so reverted to safer and cheaper ones like cholesterol and safflower seed oil as a source of linoleic acid (in its triglyceride form, which still seems to do some good over time). Isostearyl Isostearate also has some decent evidence of TEWL reduction, my thinking is that it won't make the formula too thick or comedogenic at a relatively low use level. 

Glycolic acid is there to adjust pH to 4.5. Dimethicone is on anti-soaping duty. Leaning towards using Spectrastat OEL due to its much lower cost than G2 N.


Comments

  • You will need to confirm the xanthan is compatible with the BTMS, though i'm not sure about the DuraQuench if it will be, if not you can try replacing it with a non-ionic liquid crystal emulsifier. 

    What is the require or restriction for acneic skin anyway? Just curious. 
  • What form of Niacinamide are you using?  At that pH doesn't it cause some issues? (Nicotinic acid?)
  • ZinkZink Member
    edited October 2020
    You will need to confirm the xanthan is compatible with the BTMS
    Good point I forgot about that, replacing it with sclerotium gum.¨

    What is the require or restriction for acneic skin anyway? Just curious. 

    I have a lot of customers with acne, and I still (urgh) am prone to break out on both face and body, so anything with some benefit for acne but also normal skin is good (e.g. using niacinamide and making sure it's not too comedogenic esp for those with already oily skin).

    What form of Niacinamide are you using?  At that pH doesn't it cause some issues? (Nicotinic acid?)
    Niacinamide powder, no it's only an issue with strong acids or high concentrations of weak acids (AHAs) potentially:

    "In the study “Rate Studies on the Hydrolysis of Niacinamide” and they were using hydrochloric acid to perform the experiment in the acid region (which is all we care about here).  This is a significant detail as hydrochloric acid is a strong acid whereas AHA’s are weak acids.   Acid strength is not just about how much you put in a formula – 10%, 20%, 2% etc – it is also about how readily the acid let’s go of its hydrogen ion – its dissociation constant.  Strong acids completely dissociate in water meaning that even at low % concentrations the acid is quite potent. Weak acids have only a tiny part of themselves raring to go meaning that even at high concentrations they won’t be quite so aggressive.   The above study found that a 10% Niacinamide solution heated to around 89C and then taken to a pH of below 4.5 with a STRONG acid did start to hydrolyse and form Niacin and that this conversion was a first order reaction which basically means it went from Niacinamide to Niacin without turning into anything else first.  The study found that between pH 4.5-6 very little of this crazy game of shape shifting occurred.  In fact at pH 4.5 – 6 the half-life of the solution was found to be 1000 days which probably means that the average cosmetic formulator has little to worry about."


  • Isn't Cholesterol need around 120 °C to melt? Can Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride withstand the heat? 

    in skinceuticals they use Hydrogenated Polyisobutene
    or you can try Isopropyl Lauroyl Sarcosinate but it is quite expensive.
  • Isn't Cholesterol need around 120 °C to melt? Can Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride withstand the heat? 
    Around 145C, but it's soluble in other oils and organic solvents so it generally solubilizes without needing high heat.



  • Zink said:
    Around 145C, but it's soluble in other oils and organic solvents so it generally solubilizes without needing high heat.
    Thank you @Zink . The last time i try i failed, have give it another go.
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