homogenizer or stirrer for small business starting out?

hello all. i'm in the process of doing research to start a small bath and body care company. i've done my ingredient research and i'm just about ready to begin purchasing raw materials to start playing around and formulating.

i've done some research (read the "setting up a cosmetic formulating lab" series and discussions on here, looked at blogs etc) but i'm still a bit lost as it relates to equipment, specifically stirrers/homogenizers. to start i'll be making body wash and body lotion and i'm not sure if i need an overhead stirrer, homogenizer or both. the way i understand it, most overhead stirrers have adjustable speeds and can do high shear AND low shear mixing but a homogenizer can only do high shear mixing so i'm better off with the stirrer, is this correct?

as i start experimenting i'll probably be working in small batches of maybe 200mL the most, until i'm satisfied with my base formula. should i use an immersion blender until i'm ready to scale up?

i've seen some overhead stirrers i think i like but i'm not sure what i'm supposed to be looking for in the first place, so if anyone has any advice, opinions or product recommendations they'd like to share i would love to hear them. i live in the caribbean so the easiest way for me to get things here is to purchase from US sites/companies and use a freight forwarder. paying freight and taxes can be expensive therefore my budget right now is $250. i do have amazon prime so recommendations from amazon are very welcome. thank you.

Comments

  • You definitely want a stirrer before a homogenizer. You’d have to tell us what you intend to make before us being able to recommend a homogenizer or not. 

    Sorry, I’m not help with equipment suppliers. 
  • Take a look at this one:
    https://www.katom.com/048-MX07015.html

    The beauty of this one...is that it has the biggest range of speeds...infinite adjustment from 0 rpm to 13,000 rpm.....so it can both emulsify and stir, unlike the cheapies on Amazon....which the lowest speed is well beyond the realm of stirring.
    Very heavy duty and high quality.

    Regarding which is more important... emulsifier vs stirrer....I think this question can only be answered based on which emulsifiers you intend on using!

    Note...I have the above machine...and could not be more tickled with it....after burning through 3 of the Amazon types...hehehe.
  • an overhead stirrer will do if you can find it within $250.
    a stick blender is cheaper might be a good starter and then get a stirrer when you have more experience. 

    when i make test batch at home 100-200 i do stick blender and cool down by hand, 300-1000 i do overhead stirrer. if the formulae is too complicated or need a homogenizer i hand it over to professional formulator. 

  • Sponge said:
    You definitely want a stirrer before a homogenizer. You’d have to tell us what you intend to make before us being able to recommend a homogenizer or not. 

    Sorry, I’m not help with equipment suppliers. 
    I'll be making body wash and body lotions, thought I put that in the post sorry
  • Take a look at this one:
    https://www.katom.com/048-MX07015.html

    The beauty of this one...is that it has the biggest range of speeds...infinite adjustment from 0 rpm to 13,000 rpm.....so it can both emulsify and stir, unlike the cheapies on Amazon....which the lowest speed is well beyond the realm of stirring.
    Very heavy duty and high quality.

    Regarding which is more important... emulsifier vs stirrer....I think this question can only be answered based on which emulsifiers you intend on using!

    Note...I have the above machine...and could not be more tickled with it....after burning through 3 of the Amazon types...hehehe.
    the dynamic mini pro? yes i was looking at this one as a "starter" for now, thanks for the rec and review!!!

    emulsifier vs stirrer depends on which emulsifier i want to use and thats because some ingredients just don't stand up to high shear mixing which is what the emulsifier would do right?
  • Pattsi said:
    an overhead stirrer will do if you can find it within $250.
    a stick blender is cheaper might be a good starter and then get a stirrer when you have more experience. 

    when i make test batch at home 100-200 i do stick blender and cool down by hand, 300-1000 i do overhead stirrer. if the formulae is too complicated or need a homogenizer i hand it over to professional formulator. 

    this sounds like it might be the way to go. which stick blender do you use?
  • this sounds like it might be the way to go. which stick blender do you use?
    I use a Chinese (or Japanese) one i don't know the name, bought it from liqour store about $30 i think. 

    if you want a high quality one you have to go with one Graillotion suggest above.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited September 9
    The biggest functional difference between the cheap stick blenders....and the Mini-pro....is the ability to adjust speed.  None of the cheap ones that I burned through....could operate slowly.  Their slowest setting was faster than I often wanted in certain situations.  
    The other thing....as I burned through 3 of them in about 9 months....they actually ended up being no cheaper....than one good one.  :) 

    You can not measure cost...when you need to slowly stir air out of your emulsion towards the end.
  • The biggest functional difference between the cheap stick blenders....and the Mini-pro....is the ability to adjust speed.  None of the cheap ones that I burned through....could operate slowly.  Their slowest setting was faster than I often wanted in certain situations.  
    The other thing....as I burned through 3 of them in about 9 months....they actually ended up being no cheaper....than one good one.  :) 

    You can not measure cost...when you need to slowly stir air out of your emulsion towards the end.
    oooh okay, i see. i think i'll end up going with this one, it's in my price range and sounds like my best bet since im just starting out. did you have to buy this attachment tool as well? : https://www.dynamicmixersusa.com/product/ac560/


  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited September 9
    The biggest functional difference between the cheap stick blenders....and the Mini-pro....is the ability to adjust speed.  None of the cheap ones that I burned through....could operate slowly.  Their slowest setting was faster than I often wanted in certain situations.  
    The other thing....as I burned through 3 of them in about 9 months....they actually ended up being no cheaper....than one good one.  :) 

    You can not measure cost...when you need to slowly stir air out of your emulsion towards the end.
    oooh okay, i see. i think i'll end up going with this one, it's in my price range and sounds like my best bet since im just starting out. did you have to buy this attachment tool as well? : https://www.dynamicmixersusa.com/product/ac560/


    As a bit of a perfectionist....I did buy that attachment....and I believe I paid more for it...than the machine.
    It was completely unnecessary!  Could not tell any difference in performance with the attachments that came with it (4).  ** Note ** so far I only used it in small 240 gm batches, my opinion may change as I ramp up into 4L batches.
    However...as I switch to a new project, using lamellar emulsifiers, I think it will come in handy....where I can easily switch attachments after making the initial emulsion, and then switch to the other attachment during cool down and stirring.
    Note....this is a very heavy...well built machine.  (Made in France)  So it will not be a light weight made in China gadget you may have seen in stores.  Being that it is therefore a little top heavy...always make sure to be careful...if you are leaving it standing up in a small sample beaker.  (Lost more than one batch...to an unfortunate tip over.)
  • The biggest functional difference between the cheap stick blenders....and the Mini-pro....is the ability to adjust speed.  None of the cheap ones that I burned through....could operate slowly.  Their slowest setting was faster than I often wanted in certain situations.  
    The other thing....as I burned through 3 of them in about 9 months....they actually ended up being no cheaper....than one good one.  :) 

    You can not measure cost...when you need to slowly stir air out of your emulsion towards the end.
    oooh okay, i see. i think i'll end up going with this one, it's in my price range and sounds like my best bet since im just starting out. did you have to buy this attachment tool as well? : https://www.dynamicmixersusa.com/product/ac560/


    As a bit of a perfectionist....I did buy that attachment....and I believe I paid more for it...than the machine.
    It was completely unnecessary!  Could not tell any difference in performance with the attachments that came with it (4).  ** Note ** so far I only used it in small 240 gm batches, my opinion may change as I ramp up into 4L batches.
    However...as I switch to a new project, using lamellar emulsifiers, I think it will come in handy....where I can easily switch attachments after making the initial emulsion, and then switch to the other attachment during cool down and stirring.
    Note....this is a very heavy...well built machine.  (Made in France)  So it will not be a light weight made in China gadget you may have seen in stores.  Being that it is therefore a little top heavy...always make sure to be careful...if you are leaving it standing up in a small sample beaker.  (Lost more than one batch...to an unfortunate tip over.)
    Noted! I think I'll definitely try to get my hands on that machine, thank you so much!
  • Thank you all for the help, I really really appreciate it!

  • because some ingredients just don't stand up to high shear mixing which is what the emulsifier would do right?
    What would be an example?  You have an ingredient that you want to leave as chunks?
  • Homogenisation is essential for bringing the stability and sensorials. Even if you can't tell the difference at the first glance, the microscope could show the difference, and it is related with the more uniform structure of the emulsion and the smaller size of the fat droplets. This is important when you are creating an emulsions with higher water phase which are more unstable in general. Dinamyx is not a proffesional device though! If you are planning to make a big batches, you should check the proffesional devices.

  • The biggest functional difference between the cheap stick blenders....and the Mini-pro....is the ability to adjust speed.  None of the cheap ones that I burned through....could operate slowly.  Their slowest setting was faster than I often wanted in certain situations.  
    The other thing....as I burned through 3 of them in about 9 months....they actually ended up being no cheaper....than one good one.  :) 

    You can not measure cost...when you need to slowly stir air out of your emulsion towards the end.
    oooh okay, i see. i think i'll end up going with this one, it's in my price range and sounds like my best bet since im just starting out. did you have to buy this attachment tool as well? : https://www.dynamicmixersusa.com/product/ac560/


    As a bit of a perfectionist....I did buy that attachment....and I believe I paid more for it...than the machine.
    It was completely unnecessary!  Could not tell any difference in performance with the attachments that came with it (4).  ** Note ** so far I only used it in small 240 gm batches, my opinion may change as I ramp up into 4L batches.
    However...as I switch to a new project, using lamellar emulsifiers, I think it will come in handy....where I can easily switch attachments after making the initial emulsion, and then switch to the other attachment during cool down and stirring.
    Note....this is a very heavy...well built machine.  (Made in France)  So it will not be a light weight made in China gadget you may have seen in stores.  Being that it is therefore a little top heavy...always make sure to be careful...if you are leaving it standing up in a small sample beaker.  (Lost more than one batch...to an unfortunate tip over.)
    Graillotion,
    Are you still happy with your purpose when it comes to emulsifying?  Is it correct that you did not see a benefit in using the emulsifying attachment vs the homogenizer?
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 6
    Well....this is a tough question to answer.  To answer it correctly, I would have had to make two identical formulas, and use one attachment on each.
    When I make 165 based emulsions...I just use the blender attachment.  When I am making a lamellar emulsion, I have always used the emulsifier, since I am using it for a short amount of time, then switching to stirring.
    Those that have tried my lamellar emulsions have raved about them.  But as mentioned at the beginning, I do not know, had I used the other attachment, maybe they would have been just as good?
    So I have exclusively used the emulsifier for my new lamellar projects.

  • And when you say "emulsifier," you mean the emulsifying blade -- not the special homogenizing tip, right?

    Also, in your view, what do you think the minimum quantity is that you can use this on?  I think someone above claimed 100ml?  Thank you.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 7
    when I formulate....I make 150 gm batches.

    But I use a special beaker...that keeps the entire head submerged...see attached. (I use the tall skinny 250ml version)

    https://www.amazon.com/Beaker-Borosilicate-Single-Karter-Scientific/dp/B006VYY09Q/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=250ml+narrow+beaker&sr=8-7

    Sorry...I meant, I use the high dollar homogenizing tip....the one that cost more than the machine.  :pensive:

    And FYI:  Most stick blender heads will not fit down into that beaker...as it is narrow....part of why I use the roto stator emulsifying head.  :)

  • Thank you.  I actually just bought the same beaker for the same reason.

    In terms of aeration, do you find you need to stir air out of your batches after you've used the homogenizing tip?  Or not necessary?

    I'm trying to decide between this, the Ocis 2.0, or maybe a used Turrax from eBay.  Hmmmm.
  • Also, on what speed setting are you able to comfortable use it?  I can see from this video, the person can't safely take it past 3:


    Thanks again.

  • Well....this is a tough question to answer.  To answer it correctly, I would have had to make two identical formulas, and use one attachment on each.
    When I make 165 based emulsions...I just use the blender attachment.  When I am making a lamellar emulsion, I have always used the emulsifier, since I am using it for a short amount of time, then switching to stirring.
    Those that have tried my lamellar emulsions have raved about them.  But as mentioned at the beginning, I do not know, had I used the other attachment, maybe they would have been just as good?
    So I have exclusively used the emulsifier for my new lamellar projects.

    Arlacel 165 could form lamellar emulsions!


  • suswang8 said:
    Thank you.  I actually just bought the same beaker for the same reason.

    In terms of aeration, do you find you need to stir air out of your batches after you've used the homogenizing tip?  Or not necessary?

    I'm trying to decide between this, the Ocis 2.0, or maybe a used Turrax from eBay.  Hmmmm.
    Actually funny you bring that up....when I send samples of the cream to my test group (all of whom have some skill set in cosmetics), one of the first things they ask me.....is how do you get a product with no air in it???  I don't know the answer....that is just how it comes out.  
    Let me first say....the equipment seen in your video...is EXACTLY what I use (Dynamic version....same company).  I use Montanov 202 as a primary emulsifier, and also include a polymeric and some carbomer.  So my emulsions thicken instantly when the phases are combined.

    So no...I do not NEED to stir air out....but I do stir (with a spatula) at least 10 times t/o cool down.  The tall narrow beaker....allows me the keep the head submerged...so I suspect very little air is introduced.
  • suswang8 said:
    Also, on what speed setting are you able to comfortable use it?  I can see from this video, the person can't safely take it past 3:


    Thanks again.
    Loved the video....supports what I had suspected.

    Ok....I think this lady...has never really worked with her machine.  :)  Yes...if you start it at 4...the contents will jump out of the beaker!  However...if you start it at 2...and ease it up....you can take it to 6....no sweat.  I am LMAO....that she tried to start it at high speed.
    So I always run it at 6!!!!  But NEVER start it at 6....the beaker would be empty!  :p 
  • Yes.  I don’t understand why she felt the need to increase the speed at all; it seemed like things were going fine at Level 2.  

    I think I’m now deciding between this (Dynamic/Misceo) or a Bamix with whisk attachment.  Bamix would be about half the price, but downsides are (1) only two speeds and (2) tip/bell is much wider.   Hmmm.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    I decided against stick blenders when I stumbled upon that crap cheap Ultra-Turrax-like Chinese knock-off thingamajig. I ordered it a few days ago.
    I wonder whether or not it will be any good or last long... likely not useful for more than 1 litre but that's fine with me and probably not doing well with high viscosity emulsions (not so fine with me).
    I'll keep you in the loop.
  • Yes - the FSH-2A.  I am curious about this one, too.
  • Bo77Bo77 Member
    Pharma said:
    I decided against stick blenders when I stumbled upon that crap cheap Ultra-Turrax-like Chinese knock-off thingamajig. I ordered it a few days ago.
    I wonder whether or not it will be any good or last long... likely not useful for more than 1 litre but that's fine with me and probably not doing well with high viscosity emulsions (not so fine with me).
    I'll keep you in the loop.
    Pharma, sorry to disappoint you but I can report that I got it a month ago and thinking about throwing it out. I don't know if I'm just extremely unlucky with mine  but it's garbage. Mine doesn't work as stirrer, too high for this, it will work as homogenizer. It doesn't work on lowest setting. I tried max 150ml on it. The highest viscosity emulsion I tried was regular basic emulsion of 5g emulsifier( Olivem1000), 3g butter, 2g CA and 15g oil, up to 100 water. I think you can go safely:-)) to 200-300ml with this kind of emulsion. I was curious. I think that if it would not be broken cheap crap, it can actually work LOL. BTW I bough it on Ebay for $120. I'm unlucky in my case, but I read some reviews where people actually like it. Hopefully, you'll have better luck. :-) 
  • Bo77Bo77 Member
    I'm actually looking for some "affordable" reliable homogenizer. I don't need anything fancy or powerful like crazy, just for my testers formulations I'm doing. I'm curious if homogenizer will kill carbomers in formulations. 
  • In other news, do we know anyone who owns this Rotilabo (Carl Roth) tool?  I assume it is basically a Dremel, but I am not sure? 

    They sell the attachments separately.  I guess I could use this in a Dremel?  Does the shape of the tip look like it would blend/homogenize well?   :*

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    @Bo77 Thanks for the warning. I'm less interested in it as stirrer but mainly as homogeniser (however, would have been great if it did both). Homogenisers may kill polymers if you overdo the mixing by homogenising for more than just a few minutes. I'd guess that cheaper tools are safer because of a larger gap between rotor and stator.
    @suswang8 I considered the Rotilabo tool as alternative to the Chinese tool. Carl Roth is a renowned company with good quality products. I decided against it because it's a hand held tool and made for rather small quantities. It's likely not going to work with a normal drill machine, because it's a rotor-stator attachment and there is no point in spinning the outer part and letting the inner just hang there (or vice versa).

  • Bo77 said:
    I'm actually looking for some "affordable" reliable homogenizer. I don't need anything fancy or powerful like crazy, just for my testers formulations I'm doing. I'm curious if homogenizer will kill carbomers in formulations. 
    If you only paid $120 for the FSH-2A, and it is working as a homogenizer for you, that is a good deal.  
  • Hello guys,

    I'm actually using FSH-2A. So I can share some thoughts. 
    It is not bad. When I bought it, I wasn't really happy. I thought, it's introducing way too much air into my product. However, I learnt how to work with it. I don't even use it on the highest speeed [It also gets warm very fast if used at max speed, so I'm scared to not burn it :D ] I've also made a really small batches. As 70 grams I think. Cleaning is easy, but annoying [probably with every homogen-head]. 
    The heads are short tho. So I've head some problem, where tall profile beaker wasn't the best for it. And the small head is not useful for me at all. I think I've used it twice and put it aside. :) 
    Let me know if you would have any questions about that. :)
  • suswang8 said:
    Also, on what speed setting are you able to comfortable use it?  I can see from this video, the person can't safely take it past 3:


    Thanks again.

    Interesting - If it doesn't work at least I can use it to blend my soup.
    Anyone heard about the price? If it will cost me up to $1,000-$1,500 , I would rather not.

    suswang8 said:
    In other news, do we know anyone who owns this Rotilabo (Carl Roth) tool?  I assume it is basically a Dremel, but I am not sure? 

    They sell the attachments separately.  I guess I could use this in a Dremel?  Does the shape of the tip look like it would blend/homogenize well?   :*

    very interesting - affordable, if it doesn't work at least I will have one more drill or maybe use it to blend my soup, but well the total length is 90 mm might not reach the pot's bottom.  :) :) :)
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Pattsi said:
    ...
    Anyone heard about the price? If it will cost me up to $1,000-$1,500 , I would rather not.
    ...
    The version only with the homogeniser attachment costs around $ 300 if purchased in Europe from an official retailer.
  • You can buy the standard Dynamic blender, with multiple attachments, for $150 or so, if you shop around in the US, and this should give decent results (not professional) as long as you don't make batches smaller than 250g or so.  But if you want quasi-professional results or want to do batches as small as 150g or so, you will need the MiniPro Blender Tool (rotor stator head), which typically costs around $200 additional (more than the blender itself).  And you are correct, at the end of the day, you at least have a nice hand blender to use.  A huge consideration is if you want to be able to do small batches.  That, for me, is key, but it may not be for you.    
  • Pharma said:
    Pattsi said:
    ...
    Anyone heard about the price? If it will cost me up to $1,000-$1,500 , I would rather not.
    ...
    The version only with the homogeniser attachment costs around $ 300 if purchased in Europe from an official retailer.
    suswang8 said:
    You can buy the standard Dynamic blender, with multiple attachments, for $150 or so, if you shop around in the US, and this should give decent results (not professional) as long as you don't make batches smaller than 250g or so.  But if you want quasi-professional results or want to do batches as small as 150g or so, you will need the MiniPro Blender Tool (rotor stator head), which typically costs around $200 additional (more than the blender itself).  And you are correct, at the end of the day, you at least have a nice hand blender to use.  A huge consideration is if you want to be able to do small batches.  That, for me, is key, but it may not be for you.    
    Thanks a lot guys/girls. - Think I would go for Rotilabo because I will be making small batches, 100g is ideal for me.  :)  :) :)
  • suswang8 said:
    Thank you.  I actually just bought the same beaker for the same reason.

    In terms of aeration, do you find you need to stir air out of your batches after you've used the homogenizing tip?  Or not necessary?

    I'm trying to decide between this, the Ocis 2.0, or maybe a used Turrax from eBay.  Hmmmm.
    Actually funny you bring that up....when I send samples of the cream to my test group (all of whom have some skill set in cosmetics), one of the first things they ask me.....is how do you get a product with no air in it???  I don't know the answer....that is just how it comes out.  
    Let me first say....the equipment seen in your video...is EXACTLY what I use (Dynamic version....same company).  I use Montanov 202 as a primary emulsifier, and also include a polymeric and some carbomer.  So my emulsions thicken instantly when the phases are combined.

    So no...I do not NEED to stir air out....but I do stir (with a spatula) at least 10 times t/o cool down.  The tall narrow beaker....allows me the keep the head submerged...so I suspect very little air is introduced.
    Hi, Graillotion.
    I got the Dynamic and did a first test using this blade:


    Although I had the head submerged, it seems like it still incorporates a bit of air.  My results were very similar to what that lady above on YouTube got -- except she was using the Blender Tool homogenizer -- with a thick, marshmallow/meringue-type texture.  I want to get the Blender Tool, largely because I could use it with smaller samples, but not if it too adds in air.  

    I might also try this blade:



    Did you find the Blender Tool incorporates less air than either of these two blades?  Also, are you using your device slanted (at an angle)?

    Thank you.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 14
    suswang8 said:
    suswang8 said:
    Thank you.  I actually just bought the same beaker for the same reason.

    In terms of aeration, do you find you need to stir air out of your batches after you've used the homogenizing tip?  Or not necessary?

    I'm trying to decide between this, the Ocis 2.0, or maybe a used Turrax from eBay.  Hmmmm.
    Actually funny you bring that up....when I send samples of the cream to my test group (all of whom have some skill set in cosmetics), one of the first things they ask me.....is how do you get a product with no air in it???  I don't know the answer....that is just how it comes out.  
    Let me first say....the equipment seen in your video...is EXACTLY what I use (Dynamic version....same company).  I use Montanov 202 as a primary emulsifier, and also include a polymeric and some carbomer.  So my emulsions thicken instantly when the phases are combined.

    So no...I do not NEED to stir air out....but I do stir (with a spatula) at least 10 times t/o cool down.  The tall narrow beaker....allows me the keep the head submerged...so I suspect very little air is introduced.
    Hi, Graillotion.
    I got the Dynamic and did a first test using this blade:


    Although I had the head submerged, it seems like it still incorporates a bit of air.  My results were very similar to what that lady above on YouTube got -- except she was using the Blender Tool homogenizer -- with a thick, marshmallow/meringue-type texture.  I want to get the Blender Tool, largely because I could use it with smaller samples, but not if it too adds in air.  

    I might also try this blade:



    Did you find the Blender Tool incorporates less air than either of these two blades?  Also, are you using your device slanted (at an angle)?

    Thank you.
    I use the dairy blade....when making lotion...and the blender tool...when making cream.  Yes, I seem to get less air with the blender tool.  I tend to run the homogenizer tool at an angle...because when straight up and down it seems to form a suction on the bottom of the beaker....the angle breaks the suction and the product seems to mix better.
  • Pharma said:
    I decided against stick blenders when I stumbled upon that crap cheap Ultra-Turrax-like Chinese knock-off thingamajig. I ordered it a few days ago.
    I wonder whether or not it will be any good or last long... likely not useful for more than 1 litre but that's fine with me and probably not doing well with high viscosity emulsions (not so fine with me).
    I'll keep you in the loop.
    @Pharma, please let us know if it works. It looks very tempting re price. I am just concerned it won’t be able to deal with 500g batch of any significant viscosity (anything thicker than ketchup). I have cheap Chinese overhead stirrer which isn’t great but does the job for w/o processing (the initial step when water is added by drops at low shear) but I am still using a stick blender for high shear because I can’t find any reasonable alternative. 
  • ngarayeva001ngarayeva001 Member
    edited November 14
    I am not suggesting it’s the best option on the market but it’s powerful and has smaller size head which allows making small batches (150g). I managed to make several w/si and w/o that haven’t separated for over 12 months (which doesn’t prove those are stable on a commercial level but for w/o it’s almost a success). It can deal with high viscosity if you keep the batch size within 300g.
    https://www.robertdyas.co.uk/bosch-msm2623ggb-clevermixx-dip-&-dressing-600w-hand-blender-white-&-green?source=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs4PNwuOB7QIVwdPtCh01LAuuEAQYBiABEgLML_D_BwE
  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    edited November 16
    Pharma said:
    I decided against stick blenders when I stumbled upon that crap cheap Ultra-Turrax-like Chinese knock-off thingamajig. I ordered it a few days ago.
    I wonder whether or not it will be any good or last long... likely not useful for more than 1 litre but that's fine with me and probably not doing well with high viscosity emulsions (not so fine with me).
    I'll keep you in the loop.

    I have it and it works an absolute charm for me. Instant (seemingly) emulsification, it's a beast and introduces 0 air. I will say, you have to turn the knob about halfway for it to get going. I don't know why but someone in my Facebook group said the same. 

    You CANNOT stir with it. It's far too powerful. I use it first to emulsify then switch to my overhead with propeller attachment.

    It homogenizes extremely well while the product is warm/hot and liquid, the efficacy decreases as the product gains viscosity (I'm sure you know this.)

    Make sure you clean the attachments really well before using it. I ended up with some metal bits my first time using it. 

    You will never need to use it at the highest speed. Not even close.
  • emma1985 said:
    Pharma said:
    I decided against stick blenders when I stumbled upon that crap cheap Ultra-Turrax-like Chinese knock-off thingamajig. I ordered it a few days ago.
    I wonder whether or not it will be any good or last long... likely not useful for more than 1 litre but that's fine with me and probably not doing well with high viscosity emulsions (not so fine with me).
    I'll keep you in the loop.

    I have it and it works an absolute charm for me. Instant (seemingly) emulsification, it's a beast and introduces 0 air. I will say, you have to turn the knob about halfway for it to get going. I don't know why but someone in my Facebook group said the same. 

    You CANNOT stir with it. It's far too powerful. I use it first to emulsify then switch to my overhead with propeller attachment.

    It homogenizes extremely well while the product is warm/hot and liquid, the efficacy decreases as the product gains viscosity (I'm sure you know this.)

    Make sure you clean the attachments really well before using it. I ended up with some metal bits my first time using it. 

    You will never need to use it at the highest speed. Not even close.
    Hi, Emma.
    When you say "instant emulsification," is this the kind of device that instantly whitens a preparation?  I ask because, as part of a separate chat I was having with another board member, some are of the view that emulsions will instantly turn white (a la the famous commercials of making mayonnaise) because of the introduction of air, which is what seems to be happening with me and my Dynamic mixer (and something most stick blenders are guilty of).  I know you said it seems to introduce 0 air, but I was just curious about how you sensed it was instantly working.
    Many thanks.
  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    edited November 18
    *perhaps I should have said visible air bubbles.

    i said instant emulsification because I feel like I get a much faster blend using the homogenizer than I do my immersion blender and my overhead stirrer on high speed. Perhaps more importantly, with my immersion blender, when I take breaks I often get separation, but no separation during breaks with the homogenizer. When I use the immersion blender I invariably end up with air bubbles. No air bubbles that I can see with the homogenizer:


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