antidandruff shampoo

nasrinsnasrins Member
edited September 2014 in Formulating
I use climbazol for my antidandruff shampoos, but I think it isnt so effective. are other ingredients such as zinc pirithione or salicylic acid better than climbazol? any suggestion....

Comments

  • @nasrins - research "Piroctone Olamine". It's used as a replacement for "Zinc Pyrithione".
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    @tonyh generally Piroctone is preferred for clear shampoos whereas ZPTO we all know is a fav ingredient of so many anti-dandruff recipes and which are quite obviously opaque. So the nature of formula has to be considered I suppose. Please correct me if I m wrong.
  • @millia u r always right :)
    what about ZPTO and climbazol? I saw in some papers that ZPT/Climbazole shampoo has superior efficacy
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    there are studies stating that the efficacy of climbazole is enhanced if used with another agent, but again it all comes down to the cost and final formulation type. Or you might like to optimize the efficacy of one ingredient only with the right selection of formula and its parameters.
    And thanks for the jibe @nasrins
  • @tonyh climbazol is more effective than piroctone olamine
  • tonyhtonyh Member
    edited September 2014
    @milliachemist - Well, it has been formulated into clear shampoos. Yes.  And also opaque shampoos as well (using Glycol Distearate).  >preferred for clear shampoos

    Things to be aware of when using Piroctone Olamine:

    Piroctone Olamine is a little fussy, it needs a suspending/stabilizing ingredient like "Dehydrogenated Tallow Phthalic Acid Amide" (opaque shampoo) or "Tea-Lauryl Sulfate" (clear shampoo), for example. As without stabilization it separates.

    For hair conditioner rinse out - the stabilizer can be HEC (HydroxyEthyl Cellulose), etc.

    For scalp toner it dissolves and stabilizes in Alcohol.

    And 'Piroctone Olamine' does not like nitrosating ingredients; examples: Amines (Triethanolamine), Proteins, Cocamide diethanolamine (DEA) [Note: Although I have seen it used in a formula], Cocamide monoethanolamine (MEA), etc.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited September 2014
    @tonyh Always a pleasure to have extra topping with a regular order, your comments just cleared up so many doubts which were not even raised here.  :)
  • If your shampoo may be opaque, preffer ZPTO + Climbazol or ZPTO + Salicylic Acid. Both associations are more effective than only ZPTO. Lonza has a ZPTO encapsulated in lipids which claims to be more effective due to be biologically targeted.

    But if you need a clear shampoo, Piroctone Olamine is the best option.
    Research & Development Manager Brazil at Alfaparf Milano.
    Owner and Content Director at Cosmetica em Foco.
  • @gustavo I dont have ZPTO in lab, what about climbazol+salicylic acid?
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    I'm trying Tea Tree Oil as an anti-dandruff agent because of its excellent anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. Early days yet but it seems that 0.1% might be effective. The down side is that it has quite a strong aroma and only works with some scents.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • 0.1% really?
     but I saw in some papers that 5% is enough....
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited September 2014
    Are we there yet?????????????
  • ????
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    5% tea tree oil would be incredibly strong, that kind of concentration is used to kill lice etc.
    It's a very potent and expensive oil - 5% at $180 / kg would be a pricey component too!
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • i have tea tree extraxt , i dont know its effective as same as teatree oil
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    I can't advise, but tea tree oil is a very light (like water) oil, with a very strong 'medicinal' smell, similar I suppose to pine terpenes. It is not miscible with water but can be used in shampoo provided the surfactants chosen will emulsify it. Generally it makes a milky shampoo at 0.2% and even at 0.1% it will not be completely clear, so it might work best in a pearlised shampoo. I've only been experimenting with it for about 4 weeks so please excuse my ignorance.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • thanks belassi for ur explanation...

  • Please suggest me, what is the relation between pH and Viscosity in shampoo? I want to make acidic shampoo, which precautions i should have to take? 
  • pH has little effect on viscosity, however the highest viscosity is achieved in neutral pH...
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    edited September 2014
    @bsingle, pH and viscosity are not correlated at all in any given product category. pH is only related to viscosity in the presence of specific thickeners.

    Since you are clearly a beginner to cosmetic formulation, and not a chemist, please find a formula for shampoo from a reputable website, and follow it precisely - do not deviate from it in any way or change it at all - that is the best way to make sure that you will be safe.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • @bobzchemist when u want to use formula from websites most of the time u dont have all the ingredient in one formula, so replacement is inevitable
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    edited October 2014
    @nasrins, I cannot in good conscience recommend that someone with no experience put together a shampoo (or any personal care product) without following a specific formula and then use it on a human being, even if that human being is themselves. There is too much of a risk of harm. 

    The only things I can say to a non-professional beginner are:
    1) Find a reliable formula that other people have used successfully, and follow it to the letter.
    2) If you cannot find a formula that you can make without substitution, do NOT make the formula at all.

    Swiftcraftymonkey is a reliable source for formulas http://swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.com/

    Even strictly following a formula has some risk - what if they make a weighing mistake? But I am not able to help that, I can only say that people need to take some responsibility for the harm that they might do to themselves or others.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • uhum you are right...
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    Swiftcraftymonkey is indeed a good source for trial formulae. Recommend!
    @Nasrins, I'd begin by buying Swift's EBook for whichever product you're formulating - she has one for hair care and one for creams and gels. 
    I know it is a nuisance when one lacks ingredients for a formula. That's why, I suppose, I now have over 200 ingredients in the lab. Some become mainstays; others are rejected. It is part of the development cost.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • I have always found ZP at 1% active material the best and most cost effective route. The trick is keeping it in suspension though without using expensive Carbomer type technology. Hot mix type ingredients Glycol distearate and cocamide mea work best, the good old Head & Shoulders route.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    @Chemist79 only snag there is that you've got to read up on the relevant patents very thoroughly if you go down that route; it's still an intellectual property minefield even today
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • EliEli Member, PCF student
    @tonyh thanks for your comments about stabilizing Piroctone Olamine. Can I ask you in this formula I am using which ingredient is used to stabilize the Piroctone ? Ingredients : Aqua , SLES, propylene glycol, sodium dilaureth 7 citrate, sodium chloride, decyl glucoside , propolis cera, Piroctone Olamine , PEG 55 propylene glycol oleate, citric acid, Parfum, alpha isomethyl ionone, phenoxyethanol, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propyl..butyl...

    Also I was wondering if propolis cera is a good agent as an anti dandruff ? I think here they used it exactly for that meaning. Thanks !
  • I think it is propylene glycol, because of piroctone olamine's great solubility
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