Polyethylene wax substitutes for cleansing balm?

I've been working on a cleansing balm that uses 5% polyethylene wax (Jeenate 5H) and a combination of cetyl ethylhexanoate and other esters. It's got a great texture--silky, dry, and doesn't leave any residue upon rinsing off. This is my initial formula since I noticed most cleansing balms use polyethylene.

However, I've recently decided to stay away from microplastics so polyethylene is out. Non-polyethylene cleansing balms on the market primarily use synthetic wax, but I don't have a local supplier for it. My questions are:

1. Why do the majority of cleansing balms on the market use polyethylene? What exactly does it do that other waxes/butters can't?

2. Any suggestions for polyethylene alternatives based on the first question?

Some alternatives I'm considering:
- Cetyl esters (have to order overseas)
- Microcrystalline wax + Ozokerite wax

Comments

  • SpongeSponge Member
    Polyethylene is a great all-around structure enhancer. To choose waxes effectively you really need the background with regards to crystallinity, oil absorption, melt point, syneresis, etc. I don’t have this background. Based on my base level knowledge I’d say go with microcrystalline/ozokerite with the larger proportion starting off as microcrystalline. 
  • DeedeeUkuleleDeedeeUkulele Member
    edited March 3
    Sponge said:
    Polyethylene is a great all-around structure enhancer. To choose waxes effectively you really need the background with regards to crystallinity, oil absorption, melt point, syneresis, etc. I don’t have this background. Based on my base level knowledge I’d say go with microcrystalline/ozokerite with the larger proportion starting off as microcrystalline. 
    Much appreciated! From what I've learned, ozokerite contributes firmness and higher melt point, while microcrystalline helps with oil bleed and stability. A lot of LOI's I've come across have ozokerite way below microcrystalline wax so your suggestion is spot-on. Thanks!
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