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VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
edited August 2014 in Formulating
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Comments

  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Since this is a homemade product for your personal use, you don't have to worry about making a deodorant in a convenient package for a consumer. I would look into the elastomeric silicone gels mixed with volatile silicone as a carrier, maybe with a silicone resin/volatile silicone as an additional film former.

    Triclosan, parabens, Kathon, zinc ricinoleate, etc. are potential antimicrobials/odor eliminators. You'l need to find a way of dispersing the powders - I'd suggest an immersion blender. 
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    I think if I extend Roberts comments then trimethylsiloxysilicate can be tried with evaporating silicones n a little of other things for icing on the cake.
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited November 2014
    Well as Robert pointed out you have so many elastomer gels like 9045, 9040, etc. then you have a good one from Momentive too. The name is Silsoft Gel, try optimizing different permutations and combinations. Check the compatibility and solubility of different anti-microbial agents and see where you reach with all this info.
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited November 2014
     Try dissolving TMS first in cyclomethicone (evaporating solvents like D5), then slowly add the silicone elastomer gels to adjust the viscosity. Keep some solvent free to dissolve your anti-microbial. Try using different levels of gel as in the presence of dimethicone and cyclomethicones these gels tend to liquefy quickly. Try optimizing everything with this skeletal idea.  
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    These gels might double up as viscosity builders as well provided you strike a balance of solvents and other ingredients. Though no harm in trying others as well.


  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    It has 2 thickeners and the silicone oils are for feel and application aid. You can adjust the viscosity by playing with Tribehenin and C18-36 Triglycerides. Secondly they may also claim oil free (which is still a big YES), try to make a base in light of the above ingredients and then add your active. Much easier I suppose. 
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited December 2013
    Its a salt so I doubt it and then there is no surety if they have used a solution or powder. So I still feel it has no role in aiding to the viscosity. 
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited November 2014
    you have to pour the product at a uniform temperature, should not happen that you are still in the process of pouring and the bulk in the jar or vessel or container starts setting. Read the specs for both the triglycerides, it would give you more clarity. Re the dimethicone I think you can do away with it as its sole purpose is to counter the whitening effect of the salt post drying, or maybe keep upto 0.5 to 1% for application purposes.
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Guess thats the best one, try to finalize the base and once you are satisfied then try adding the active. Would indicate you a stage by stage process and if there is a problem you would know where you are faulting with the formula.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    edited January 2014
     C18-36 acid triglyceride is Syncrowax HGLC, a carnauba wax replacement. The melting point is 70C/158F.
    Tribehenin is Syncrowax HRC. The melting point is 65 -70C

    It is simply not possible to incorporate these into any silicone fluid at room temperature. Please be very careful about heating cyclomethicone.

    I really think you should give up on the idea of making sticks. It will take much more work to get it right than a gel will. If you feel compelled to put your creation into a commercial container, just get a container that works with gels, and fill it with your gel.

    You are making this way too hard on yourself. Get some silicone elastomer gels. Grind some water-soluble antibacterials into them. Possibly, add some silicone compatable film formers. fill into containers. The anti-bacterials will activate as you sweat. That should solve your problems.

    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • simonasimona Member
    edited November 2014


    You could consider this kind of recipient for your gel - if you live in Europe. I am also trying to make my own deodorant stick, but not because I have developed any dermatitis due to the ingredients, but for the fun of it, and 3 of the ingredients available in the EU market (for homecrafters such as you and me) are listed here :
    - bacti-pur - INCI: Candida bombicola
    / glucose / methyl rapeseedate ferment, water, potassium sorbate
    - deodorant complex - INCI: Triethyl
    citrate, Farnesol
    - alum stoner (powder) - INCI: potassium alum.

    Another ingredient is indeed zinc ricinoleate (sold by other small suppliers), I have not used it as I find it too expensive (and I have to sum up quite an order to make it acceptable cost-wise :) )

    You may also consider Usnea Barbata CO2 extract - it is said that the usnic acid has antiseptic/antiinflamatory properties

    We do not get to see any triclosan or silicone gels, not even sodium stearate to make the clear stick gels , so homecrafters just use the above ingredients .

    I have used farnesol / triethyl citrate in my deodorant and during the warmer months it works OK-ish, and I do sweat a lot. Potassium alum also helped overnight in reducing the body odor, but for more active days and job-related I often still use aluminum derivatives in the commercial products.

    Keep us posted with your recipe/results, if you do not mind sharing, and GOOD LUCK!
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Grant industries - I'd try the TSS-5 first:

    Dow Corning: either 593 FLUID or 670 FLUID
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    edited November 2014
     do a Google search for distributors of those ingredients.  Typically, a distributor will sell to a smaller company.  There is no business license to have per se.  At least in the US you could be a sole proprietorship and don't need much else.  Of course, I would recommend starting an LLC business for anyone who wants to make cosmetics or even as a consultant.
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited July 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Yes, but there will be nothing to hold the actives onto your skin, and nothing to keep them suspended.

    Try adding some of this:


    or this:

    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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  • VingRhames3VingRhames3 Member
    edited August 2014
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