Pigment Dispersion in BB Cream

vjayvjay Member
edited April 2014 in Formulating

Hi,

I am developing BB Cream in that I am using Iron oxide pigments.

I read so many literature and connected with so many supplier like sensient, Merck, Radian,Neelikol, Keol, etc for the pigment dispersion in cream.

everybody are telling that by mixing method we can disperse and use it that trial I have done but each and every trials with different emollients pigments are separating.

than some supplier told me that you have to use coated like pigment with dimethicone coated, coated with silane that also I used but still no result separation are there.

Some supplier are told me that you have to use pre dispersed (paste form) pigments - that also I have tried but still I am in the same page -separation.

Can anybody help that how can I develop a BB cream without pigment separation in the cream.

Comments

  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Vjay depends what your formula is, if you look at foundation creams and makeups they too have high quantity of pigments without separation. Be a bit more clear on formulation part and you might get right advice here.
  • becksbarrowbecksbarrow Member, PCF student
    Hi Vjay, 

    I haven't formulated BB Creams but I have colour matched and made a lot! I spent 6 months developing numerous BB creams for lots of different companies with my chemist. I have made probably 100's  of small and large batches including some up to 100kgs in production. 
    I only saw the iron oxide pigments separate a few times. Once after too much emulsification, once after too little and on one occasions it was because they weren't milled for long enough. Are you making an o/w or w/o emulsion? Are you pre-milling your pigments before you add them? If you are making an water in oil you could try making up PCB's and blending the colours to colour match.
  • vjayvjay Member

    Hi becksbarrow,

    I want to make W/O emulsion and pigment % are (Titanium Dioxide 5 to 7 %),(Iron oxide Yellow 0.5 to 1.0), (Iron oxide Red 0.1 to 0.5) and (Iron oxide Red 0.05 to 0.1).

    can you suggest which emulsifier I have to use for BB Cream.at present I am trying steareth 2 & steareth 21 emulsifier from croda.

    Can you suggest which emollient has a best dispersabiltiy for the pigment. At present I am using Caprylic Capric Trigyceride as an emollient and dispersabiltiy.

    for 100g and 200g rnd batch how we can pre-milling your pigments (that's why I tried pre dispered and coated pigments also)

    I am adding dimethicone 5 % also in my formulation

     

     

  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    what is suspending your pigments?
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    @Bobz vjay is talking about w/o emulsion, I guess it would be viscosity that will hold the emulsion. But still very unsure about the nature of formula so its kind of dilemma to make any comment. But if he is using Abils and related coemulsifiers then he should use coated pigments, sodium chloride would be the thickener for me in this kind of formula. Again pure speculation as not sure what vjays formula is.
  • becksbarrowbecksbarrow Member, PCF student
    edited April 2014
    If you have a coffee grinder or a spice grinder they are prefect for milling pigments minimum 3 burst of 10 seconds. Due to the friction the coffee grinders can over heat, multiple short millings is best - a colleague caused a small lab fire with a grinder. Shake the grinder between each milling. The pigments will be a lot smoother. Also make up the pigment blend at 110% then weigh in the correct amount. If a particular colour separates out then you could consider making PCBs (primary colour bases) and start with the white and add the red yellow and then your black until you make the preferred shade. We would mill all pigments before making a batch. In production we used a triple roller mill.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    edited April 2014
    @becksbarrow ditto we used to do in our lab for pigment grinding and it worked great, never had any specks, and ditto for weighing of pigments. In fact for a normal o/w emulsion too we used to weigh a bit extra of oil phase to compensate,
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Even in a thick w/o emulsion, especially if all the viscosity is coming from the water phase concentration, using only a thin base oil to carry your pigments is an invitation to instability as the pigments prove that gravity works by setting out and breaking the emulsion in the process.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • mariamaria Member
    I learnt to disperse oxide pigments and TO2 in a bit of solubilizer for my BB creams, I was given the full explanation that has obviously to do with the surface tension.
    I use it in o/w, don't know if it works for w/o as well.
    I would be nice to here your opinion.
  • vjayvjay Member

    Sorry Guys,

    I want to Make (O/W emulsion - 30 % oil and 70 % water).

    Maria please share your view with me.

  • vjayvjay Member

    Which thickener I have to use in this kind of formulation.

    Can I Use Ultrez 20 (Acrylates Co polymer) with Titanium Dioxide ?

    Or I have to use Xanthan Gum.

  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    use veegum HV and sodium cmc, best combo for a regular pigmented o/w emulsion.
  • vjayvjay Member
    ok I will try
  • mariamaria Member
    vjay I disperse pigments in a bit of oil, then I add a solubilizer like PGE-10 laurate and then in the oil fase.
    I do use carbopol ultrez 21 and 30 with titanium Dioxide along with xanthan gum , but in o/w emulsions.
    Milla I use both thickeners you mentioned, but never together, in what ratio do you recommend to use them? Thank you
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    @milliachemist nailed it. Veegum and CMC are synergistic, and highly recommended for pigmented products. Since you will be getting a reasonable amount of thickening from the gums, you can lower the oil-phase thickeners if you have any in your formula. No other thickeners (Carbomers, etc.) should be needed.

    Veegum is made by RT Vanderbilt. They even make a product, Veegum Plus, that has veegum and CMC mixed together.


    There's a fair amount of other literature available:



    Even if I've mentioned this before, it bears repeating: Reading supplier literature should be a regular habit for cosmetic chemists and aspiring cosmetic chemists and even hobbyists. Some claims need to be taken with a grain of salt, but there is a great deal of very valuable information in supplier literature that is NOT available anywhere else.


    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    @Bobzchemist couldn't agree more on the reading part and then implementing it on lab scale first.
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