Best moisturizer for a rinse-off product.

I'm a novice formulator who really wants to formulate my own products for personal use and as a hobby. I know I can just find products I like, but I would like to learn.

I'm trying to find the best moisturizer for a rinse-off product. A moisturizer that can be deposited via surfactant foam onto skin. Currently, I'm looking at Amodimethicone, Dimethicone 

OR Petrolatum via a polymer. I can't find much information on how to make petrolatum more effectively stick in a surfactant system. I know their is a patent for it, but I'm not sure where to obtain this product. Perhaps with a polymer such as cationic guar or HydroxyEthylCellulose? I also don't want to break a patent if I ever decide to sell the product on a small-scale basis. 

I know your busy, so any information or redirects to information would be much appreciated. Thanks so much for ANY advice. 

Comments

  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    edited March 2016
    Well, what to say. It is possible to include a silicone in the body wash, but it will likely be pretty expensive since it will need to be a water dispersible silicone. For instance I have Silsense DW-18 here and it really is a nice item, but it isn't cheap. 
    I really don't think the petrolatum idea will fly.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    This is a pet peeve of mine. Use rinse-off surfactant products to cleanse. Period. Trying to get them to moisturize only makes for frustration and bad products.

    If you need a moisturizer, make a leave-on moisturizer - it's not hard to make a good one.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    Damn. I suppose this means Bob won't be able to help me with my nail varnish hair conditioner.  :-O
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • jirobandjiroband Member
    edited March 2016
    First of all, be sure to include glycerin at around 3%. It's an effective humectant and probably the least expensive one you'll find. 

    If you are creating something like a shampoo or bodywash, and want to step it up a notch, my favorite is PEG-7 Olivate (Olivem 300 from Lotioncrafter), used at 3%. It's an emollient, lubricant, anti-irritant, solubilizer, and thickener -- and it doesn't suppress foaming/ lathering.

    In addition, you can add a film-former like a hydrolyzed protein (used at around 2%) which will help the skin to retain moisture.

    You mentioned using dimethicone which is also another good choice. If used, keep that at around 2%.

    In my humble opinion, I would avoid petrolatum.
    I'm a licensed Landscape Architect -- not a chemist. I just really like this stuff.
  • Check out the Silsoft range by bausch and lomb they are dimethicone copolyols. Silicone plus a PEG. Work well and you dont need much in your formula for deposition onto the hair or skin
  • This is a pet peeve of mine. Use rinse-off surfactant products to cleanse. Period. Trying to get them to moisturize only makes for frustration and bad products.

    If you need a moisturizer, make a leave-on moisturizer - it's not hard to make a good one.

    This^^^..but glycerin is nice and cheap.
  • I think this is a perfectly acceptable question, time is precious in the modern world and there is a huge market for products with dual functionality. I saw some interesting euromonitor data recently that stated that moisturisation was the single most desired attribute for consumers purchasing "wash off" products and that over 50% of global "wash off" product launches in 2015 made some kind of moisturisation claim.

    However moisturisation from a wash off product is difficult (and shouldn't be confused with skin feel) the very nature of surfactants is to remove grease and dirt which would include natural skin lipids. Personally Glycerin would not be my choice I don't believe it is substantive to the skin enough in a surfactant based product. I would go down the refatting route and would recommend trying Ceraphyl RMT or good old Lamesoft PO65.
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    It's an acceptable, or even a great question for a pro - I think a novice would be better off starting with single purpose products until they get a good handle on formulating.

    That being said, you could look into silicone deposition from surfactants using cationic modified gums, like Jaguar C-17.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    I agree with @Chemist79 about using glycerin. It is water soluble and will simply wash away during use. It will have no noticeable impact in regards to moisturizing for a rinse off product. This is true of any water soluble ingredient that doesn't have some mechanism to stay behind.

    Cationic polymers are a good choice. 
  • DavidDavid Member
    edited October 2016
    ...and still it is hard to be sure. Almost all shaving gels have glycerine or sorbitol in them. When I was (re)formulating a shaving gel I kept glycerine in there mostly for the moisturizing claim but when testing (on myself) I didn't notice any difference. A quat made a difference though. However to "feel" moisturized and to "be" moisturized are usually two different things. 
  • Personally I like adding some PEG-45M or PEG-90M,  gives a nice pseudo-moisturizing feel to rinse-off products.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    There is a secondary reason you can include glycerin in a rinse off product. It can help prevent the product from drying out. Typically, a shaving gel is dispensed from a pump or aerosol and some of the product can get left behind in the opening. Without a humectant, that bit of extra product can dry out and block the opening.  If you include glycerin in your formula you reduce the chances of that happening.  It doesn't moisturize the skin, it moisturizes the formula.
  • DavidDavid Member
    edited October 2016
    @Perry - thanks, good point - that could indeed be the reason why the "big ones" keep on using it in aerosol shaving gels. I will keep it in mind and do some tests if I get a similar project again.

Sign In or Register to comment.