Is Derma-Rolling worth it?

Could you get the same effect from acids?

Comments

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    What convinces you that derma-rolling does anything?
    What is it supposed to do?
  • Perry said:
    What convinces you that derma-rolling does anything?
    What is it supposed to do?

    It's supposedly used by beauticians to stimulate the skin by pricking it with small needles to encourage cell turnover or something like that.
  • Derma-Rolling is now considered "old" procedure. :D 

    It's called Micro-needling now and you use a pen-looking-like device that creates perpendicular channels into the skin. (Unlike roller, that caused a micro-tears in the skin). 

    It basically and supposedly damages the skin and depending on the depth and the amount, it starts a healing process that brings all the good stuff into your skin such as mineral, minerals, etc... and start building collagen, elastin etc... It also allows cosmetics to penetrate deeper thru the channels.
    Most ppl are using hyaluronic acid during for a good glide and right after. 
    Skin peeling is also common (side) effect, but I guess not like when you use acid peelings.

    I doing microneedling myself (on me). :)
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    It seems some positive data is available, but not overwhelmingly convincing.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1748681517302504

    The authors conclude " The current literature does show some methodological shortcomings, and further research is required to truly establish microneedling as an evidence-based therapeutic option for treating scars, wrinkles and other skin conditions."
  • Perry said:
    It seems some positive data is available, but not overwhelmingly convincing.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1748681517302504

    The authors conclude " The current literature does show some methodological shortcomings, and further research is required to truly establish microneedling as an evidence-based therapeutic option for treating scars, wrinkles and other skin conditions."

    On that note, wouldn't anything that irritates the skin also have to stimulate turnover?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    I'm not sure it has been determined that cell turnover results from any type of skin irritation, but it seems reasonable. 
  • DaveStoneDaveStone Member
    edited October 2021
    Perry said:
    I'm not sure it has been determined that cell turnover results from any type of skin irritation, but it seems reasonable. 
    People say around here that even soap irritates the skin. So maybe it's good for once a week usage. Clay masks also irritate the skin and some people swear by them.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    Microneedling works by physical insult of the skin which promotes an immune response / healing reaction to stimulate development of new elastin/collagen.

    Acids promote exfoliation of the dead/upper layers of the skin, which would also promote a weak immune response, but the action is primarily the sloughing of skin cells, so acids are not nearly as invasive as microneedling. 
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
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