Cold process

EliEli Member, PCF student
The usual way of making a cosmetic emulsion is by heating the two phases separately and bringing them together while mixing at high speed. Why is it usual to heat? not only to melt the lipophilic phase but also because of the emulsifier right?.. why the most of the emulsifiers work at high temperatures? is there a specific reason?

Comments

  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    It depends on the nonpolar ingredients and emulsifiers. By using no solids and choosing an appropriate emulsifier system you can do cold process emulsions easily enough. 
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • EliEli Member, PCF student
    Thank you for the answer! So any liquid emulsifier can be use for cold process?
  • MakingSkincareMakingSkincare Member, Professional formulator
    As Belassi said, if all ingredients are liquid at room temperature then there is no need to heat.

    Cold process emulsifiers vary greatly and many have formulation restrictions so it's advisable to research.  I'd recommend the Seppic range - the simulgels, sepigels, sepiplus etc.  They are sensitive to electrolytes.

    If you are a diy homecrafter you can buy these in small amounts: Sepigel 305 (personalformulator), Sepiplus (lotioncrafter), simulgel INS 100 (chemistrystore renamed it: body cream & lotion creator) or Simulgel EG (makingcosmetics renamed it: gelmaker emu).
    Jane Barber
    www.makingskincare.com
    www.learncosmeticformulation.com (free online course)
    Formulation discussion forum (18,000 members): www.facebook.com/groups/makingskincare/
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    The upside is ease of production and not needing to spend time in a cool-down phase. The downside is likely to be the increased cost of using a more sophisticated emulsifier system.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Agreed with @Belassi and @MakingSkincare but generally downsides overshadow the upsides. Anyhow my personal favorite is Sepigel 305 and its magical if used properly in a formula, hot or cold doesn't matter. 
  • EliEli Member, PCF student
    Thank you very much guys! Also for the examples. I was evaluating Stabylen 30, a polymeric emulsifier similar to a carbomer with hydrophobic characteristics. I guess it is not so well known as the ones you are mentioning. First it is better to search for formulation restrictions as you suggested 
  • @>;65C, weaker hydrogen bonding!
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