Is sunflower oil a good occlusive?

 

Comments

  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited August 27
    Generally the higher the oleic acid content is...the more occlusive an oil is.

    You might find this of some help:

    The Best Occlusives to Use in Natural Skincare (botaneri.com)

    I would not rely on it as a sole occlusive...unless you are chasing a minimalist framework.  Some other nice ones are candelilla wax, and my personal favorite...Floraesters K-20W® Jojoba.

    Imagine adding as much of this as you feel you need...without ever making your product greasy or oily!


  • DaveStoneDaveStone Member
    edited August 27
    Generally the higher the oleic acid content is...the more occlusive an oil is.

    You might find this of some help:

    The Best Occlusives to Use in Natural Skincare (botaneri.com)

    I would not rely on it as a sole occlusive...unless you are chasing a minimalist framework.  Some other nice ones are candelilla wax, and my personal favorite...Floraesters K-20W® Jojoba.

    Imagine adding as much of this as you feel you need...without ever making your product greasy or oily!


    Thanks for the info. I was also looking into silicone variants. MakingCosmetics has like a dozen choices for dimethicone. I don't understand the differences between all them...and what PEG signifies. Then there's amodimethicone. Do any of these silicones leave a greasy/oily film?
    By the way, would you or anyone else recommend this:
  • For being a good "occlusive", it depends on what factor you want to compare it against since there's TEWL or permeability to look at. 

    The "PEG" normally means that it would be water soluble to a certain point, that being a surfactant / emulsifier. 

    You can look into the different skin feel based on the different silicone types, for example liquid vs crosspolymers. 

    Makingcosmetics do list the recommended type of product for the ingredients, so for amodimethicone, it's a blend for hair conditioning. 
  • DaveStone said:

    By the way, would you or anyone else recommend this:
    Cholesterol tends to be paired with ceramides.  I don't think formulators seek it out on its own (that often).  Many of the ceramide mixes...already have the proper balance of cholesterol included in the blend.
  • DaveStone said:

    By the way, would you or anyone else recommend this:
    Cholesterol tends to be paired with ceramides.  I don't think formulators seek it out on its own (that often).  Many of the ceramide mixes...already have the proper balance of cholesterol included in the blend.

    Would it be as effective as silicone for reducing TEWL?
  • DaveStoneDaveStone Member
    edited August 27
    jemolian said:
    For being a good "occlusive", it depends on what factor you want to compare it against since there's TEWL or permeability to look at. 

    The "PEG" normally means that it would be water soluble to a certain point, that being a surfactant / emulsifier. 

    You can look into the different skin feel based on the different silicone types, for example liquid vs crosspolymers. 

    Makingcosmetics do list the recommended type of product for the ingredients, so for amodimethicone, it's a blend for hair conditioning. 
    I read that you could apply this directly on the skin like you would a butter or petrolatum. Seems pretty convenient. Yet in the SDS, it says to wash off skin if contact occurs. I'm confused.
  • Normally the silicone crosspolymers won't be used at such as high percentage, since any percentage lower than 5% should be sufficient for the skin feel modifying purposes. You can also consider the info from Lotioncrafter if you need more reference, and also any manufacturer info on ulprospector. 

    For the SDS, i'd assume it would be the general comment or remark for production purposes. 
  • Yes... SDS...is often used for an industrial accident.  You know...for emergency responders....or should a truck tip on the highway.


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