Homogenizing "the next day"

Hello, all.

I noticed on Olionatura, Heike Kaser mentions that homogenizing for a couple of minutes the day helps for emulsion stability, and I just noticed this step mentioned in the instructions someone posted for a particular recipe.

When you make your emulsions, is homogenizing the next day standard practice for you as well?

Comments

  • ggpetrovggpetrov Member
    edited July 31
    For me that's the workflow. The homogenization after 8 - 12 hours, drastically changes the haptics of the emulsion. I guess that's because the fatty alcohols and waxes needs more time to stabilize themselfs in the emulsion. Please note that this is workflow for homecrafters, also it is aplicable for lotions, where the viscosity isn't too thick. 
  • ggpetrov said:
    drastically changes the haptics of the emulsion.
    That's really interesting! Out of curiousity, what tends to happen?
  • suswang8suswang8 Member
    I'm doing low viscosity all the way, so eager to hear more about this.

    On Olionatura, the English translation is, "With all emulsions, it makes sense to let them 'ripen' for 24 hours and stir them again well the next day, as they develop in consistency."
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Heike Käser uses mainly nautral, natural identical, or non-petrochemistry derived emulsifiers combined with waxes and fatty alcohols. Many of these show marked thickening over the course of 1-2 days post manufacturing. Depending on the emulsion type, re-homogenisation can actually improve stability and also tends to drop viscosity (the latter is from my personal observations).
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited August 1
    Pharma said:
    Heike Käser uses mainly nautral, natural identical, or non-petrochemistry derived emulsifiers combined with waxes and fatty alcohols. Many of these show marked thickening over the course of 1-2 days post manufacturing. Depending on the emulsion type, re-homogenisation can actually improve stability and also tends to drop viscosity (the latter is from my personal observations).
    @Pharma Is there a type of emulsion...that can be damaged with a secondary blast....say a lamellar structured emulsion?
  • ggpetrov said:
    drastically changes the haptics of the emulsion.
    That's really interesting! Out of curiousity, what tends to happen?
    It changes the way you feel the emulsion on the skin. I think it become softer and absorbs faster. Also I don't think it affects to viscosity, I don't have that impression.
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