Making you own infusions/glycerites etc.- is it not feasible to selll?

CinemaCinema Member
Hello all again, I guess with all the reading I have been doing on this forum- brought me to an interesting thread which posed important questions for me.  There was an old thread stating that if you are making your own ingredient- it will be a hard sell when it comes to ...well actual selling. The sellers, of course want to see safety data sheets etc for the ingredients. Now, I do understand if someone has an herb garden and they are picking their herbs and making macerations or their own essential oils etc- that will be difficult to procure. I do make some infused oils, hydrosols, tea water and glycerites and then use them in my formulations sometimes along with all the other standard available ingredients- would that be a problem down the line as well. The herbs, seeds etc are bought from vendors of course ( I do not grow my own). Just looking down the line if this is doable/acceptable. 

Comments

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    No, not unless you have the testing and documentation for the "standard" and testing for each individual lot (batch produced). Buyers can and will ask for these documents. They ensure consistency and safety in botanicals for example. Your "glycerites" are untested. The testing can be costly. Just buy standardized ingredients.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • CinemaCinema Member
    No, not unless you have the testing and documentation for the "standard" and testing for each individual lot (batch produced). Buyers can and will ask for these documents. They ensure consistency and safety in botanicals for example. Your "glycerites" are untested. The testing can be costly. Just buy standardized ingredients.
    Thanks. that helps and saves me from spending more hours on this exercise- even though I loved doing it.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    If your starting material is clean and free from or rather below approved limits for toxins/microbes/pesticides/heavy metals, an extract is likely 'clean' too.
    I'm not convinced that cosmetic extract manufacturers actually test a lot of things but I'd assume (I do not know, I simply imply 'evil' intentions ;) ) they rely on the suppliers of their raw materials and extrapolate. As an exampel: You can't enrich a water soluble toxin in an oil infusion and if said toxin within a starting material is below approved margines...
    It also depends on the quantities you sell, at least in Europe. Small yearly sales of artisanal/manual production are often allowed some freedom.
    Many manufacturers also just take random samples of things which are likely okay. Besides, one can't possibly test for everything without driving costs and labour upwards.
    However, as a cosmetic manufacturer (in Europe), you are liable for defaults in what you produce/sell and it's up to you to guarantee consumer safety. How you do that is your choice and not super well regulated.
  • CinemaCinema Member
    @Pharma
    thanks but it is the same in US as well. But it all comes down to, if getting clearances for something like this is going to be a pain - it is likely not worth it.
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