EcoCert thoughts?

We all know EWG is a bunch of clowns, and 'clean' has no definition. I am formulating for a greeny/cleany client and was thinking of following EcoCert standards and raw materials for a guideline. What are your thoughts on this organization. 
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Comments

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    They are an organization who has adopted a certain philosophy and will use science whenever it supports the conclusions they want to make about ingredients. Of course, they will also ignore science when it conflicts with what they believe.

    Additionally, they are a business designed to make money and have demonstrated they will loosen their standards if it makes business sense. For example, they used to not allow sulfates but now they do. 
  • suspected. but dang. 
    thanks Perry!
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Rockstargirl:

    EcoCert is not much different that any of the other natural standards organizations, all of whom have pretty much the same allowed ingredients and prohibited ingredients ... you'll find some variations here and there, but not that many.

    Unless you are going to seek certification of the product under EcoCert, why restrict yourself to their list of approved ingredients?  Better, use you own best judgement as to what natural/clean ingredients are appropriate to achieve your product objective, unless there are restrictions on a marketing channel that you are targeting such as Whole Foods or Ulta Clean Beauty guidelines.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @MarkBroussard - this is where I think all of these natural standards organizations are dropping the ball. None of them have made any substantial inroads with building consumer awareness of the standard thereby driving consumer demand. 

    Anyone can come up with a standard, create an impressive looking logo and put it on their label. This would have as much impact on consumers as an official seal from Ecocert or even EWG.

    Companies already do this same thing with a bunny. You put a rabbit logo somewhere on your package & consumers think it's cruelty free. The Leaping Bunny standard is not really extra convincing. 

  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Perry:

    Agreed ... I don't think any of the natural standards seals really resonate much with consumers except for Organic certification.  To their credit, the Leaping Bunny does have reasonably good consumer awareness, but then how many companies are doing animal testing on cosmetic products these days ... virtually no one that I can think of.  You see tons of products that are Leaping Bunny and Vegan, but are chock full of synthetic ingredients.

    Also, you see lots of "Certification Seals" on products that were created by a graphic artist for the company selling the product made to look like an official seal from a certification body, but the products are not actually certified.

    It's really sad that some in the industry try to dupe consumers in this manner.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals & Clean Beauty arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program/Clean At Sephora/Credo Clean guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • PhilGeisPhilGeis Member, Professional formulator
    It's a license to lie to gullible consumers.  
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