MARSHMALLOW ROOT

hi guys i wanted to ask a quick question I'm using marshmallow root, slippery elm, burdock root, and hibiscus in my cosmetic product but I'm boiling them then starning it but the thing is do i let it cool then add my other water phases and then reheat the water phase again along with the oil??

Comments

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    The procedure you are describing is more like two things.

    1. You are making a raw material
    2. You are making a cosmetic formula

    If this is a product you wish to sell then you will need to keep these procedures separate. You should have a specific method for how you first make the raw material. And you should have a method for how you make your formula. This is the only way to produce a consistent product.

    But if you are just making this for yourself, yes I'd just let it cool and then add the ingredient like it's any other water based extract. Then proceed like you would making your emulsion.
  • Perry said:
    The procedure you are describing is more like two things.

    1. You are making a raw material
    2. You are making a cosmetic formula

    If this is a product you wish to sell then you will need to keep these procedures separate. You should have a specific method for how you first make the raw material. And you should have a method for how you make your formula. This is the only way to produce a consistent product.

    But if you are just making this for yourself, yes I'd just let it cool and then add the ingredient like it's any other water based extract. Then proceed like you would making your emulsion.
    hey Perry thanks for answering the question but I'm a bit confused lol so what I'm doing is making a conditioner and I want to use the herbs (marshmallow root, slippery elm, burdock root, and hibiscus) but in order for me to get the benefits I have to boil them in my distilled water and then strain it but the thing is I have other ingredients for my water phase such as aloe Vera, panthenol, extracts etc...  but how would i add those in because ik I cant make it boil with the herbs so do I make that herb mix cool then add the other water phase and then reheat it??
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Yes, cool it then use the herb mix like it's another raw material.
    In truth, it's unlikely you'll see any difference no matter how you put these things together.
  • Perry said:
    Yes, cool it then use the herb mix like it's another raw material.
    In truth, it's unlikely you'll see any difference no matter how you put these things together.
    ok thank you so much this was really helpful so just to clarify  boil them let it cool? measure out my other water phase and my oil phase put my aloe and stuff in the marshmallow root mix and put both phases on heat and do you think optiphen plus is a good preservative to cover the whole mixer?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Yes, boil, strain it, let it cool, then add it to the water phase like it is another extract.  You don't need to put the aloe and stuff in the marshmallow root mix. You should put everything into your water phase.  And then you can heat it up. Hope that makes sense.

    (Text probably isn't the best way to communicate this.)

    Optiphen plus might work. But you're using natural ingredients which may be highly contaminated with natural bacteria/molds/fungi so it might not work. I personally prefer more robust preservatives which would include parabens & formaldehyde donors but I think safety is the most important thing when it comes to preservation. In my opinion avoiding those types of preservatives is more risky.
  • Perry said:
    Yes, boil, strain it, let it cool, then add it to the water phase like it is another extract.  You don't need to put the aloe and stuff in the marshmallow root mix. You should put everything into your water phase.  And then you can heat it up. Hope that makes sense.

    (Text probably isn't the best way to communicate this.)

    Optiphen plus might work. But you're using natural ingredients which may be highly contaminated with natural bacteria/molds/fungi so it might not work. I personally prefer more robust preservatives which would include parabens & formaldehyde donors but I think safety is the most important thing when it comes to preservation. In my opinion avoiding those types of preservatives is more risky.
    thank you so much and yes I really hate texting I like talking on the phone it makes me understand quicker lol... so what type of preservative should i use?
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Keep in mind that since your materials aren't standardized (an extensive process), you would unlikely get this Formulation into many sales outlets. Buyers can and will request documentation for each and every Raw material. We do a great deal of work with NSF and Credo Beauty. They for example will request these documents.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • Keep in mind that since your materials aren't standardized (an extensive process), you would unlikely get this Formulation into many sales outlets. Buyers can and will request documentation for each and every Raw material. We do a great deal of work with NSF and Credo Beauty. They for example will request these documents.
    hi when you say " your materials aren't standardized (an extensive process)" what do you mean by that? and when you say this "you would unlikely get this Formulation into many sales outlets" do you mean I wouldn't get my products in stores? because I wasn't planning the list the herbs that ill be using on my labels  (business its infused in my water and I will then strain it )
    so would you recommend not using the herbs?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    I think what @Microformulation is saying is that you can't sell these products because of the way you are processing your raw materials.

    "Infusing" a product with natural materials as you've described is putting chemicals into the water that weren't there before. It doesn't matter that these chemicals come from natural sources, you are still infusing it with chemicals.

    So, you'll need to be able to prove that the chemicals you're putting in your formula are safe. All cosmetic companies have to be able to do this. How will you do that?

    The way cosmetic companies do it is that their raw material suppliers have a standardized method for making their raw materials which includes chemical and physical specifications for what makes up the components of all of their raw materials. This is where the "extensive process" comes in.

    You should also be listing all the known chemicals you're putting in your formula. The purpose of the ingredient list is to alert people of potential allergens in your formulas. For example, if someone was allergic to marshmallow root, slippery elm, or burdock root, they shouldn't be using your product. As the product manufacturer you need to be alerting consumers of potential problems. 

  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited February 17
    @Perry is absolutely correct.

    These products are available from multiple credible distributors. Here are some links to a good site;

    In the end you are producing a final retail product, not manufacturing raw materials. They are vastly different tasks.

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    It's also worth noting that the FDA specifically says you have to be able to prove the safety of your ingredients and that just because something is natural does not mean it is automatically safe.

    https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmetics-science-research/product-testing-cosmetics#Who_s_responsible
Sign In or Register to comment.