Really need helps about lab set up equipment!

IGiseleIGisele Member, PCF student
Hi, dear friends. I'm a cosmetic hobbyist and make skincare products at home. I use a kitchen handmixer before (it's bad). I'm going to buy a professional mixer but I'm so struggling to choose the right model since I have no chemistry background. Can you guys give me some advice? I read some previous posts but the models are only sold in US. I'm based in EU.


I would like use the mixer to make facial creams,body butter and gels. The model could make 100ml sample to 10 liters ideally. Someone told me I must buy different models for variable volumes.


I try to contact Silverson and IKA. But they ask me so many technical questions about specific gravity, particle size, mixing temperature, viscosity cps and so many that I have no ideas....And finally I failed to choose the right model.


I'm interested in the model IKA Eurostar 60 digital. http://www.ika.com/owa/ika/catalog.product_detail?iProduct=4446000&iProductgroup=187&iSubgroup=&iCS=1. But someone told me it can work for very low viscosity liquids such as tonics or foams but not creams. 


For the speed, viscosity and torque, how much is enough?


Can you please recommend the mixer suitable for my needs? And what stirrers/paddles are essential? I'm struggling on it for many days....

Comments

  • IGiseleIGisele Member, PCF student
    edited January 2015
    And I'm also interested in this model. http://www.caframo.com/cosmetic/lab_products_hightorque_ultraspeedBDC6015.php because it said it made for cosmetic use. And it could be an alternative to homogenzer?
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    a paddle stirrer like the ones you've linked to will not do the job of a high-shear mixer, no matter how fast it goes; and to create reasonably stable creams, you will need a high-shear mixer

    the GM-A or GM-B model lab mixer from Joshua Greaves & Sons is a good general-purpose mixer for the scale you want; last time we bought a GM-B it was about £1,300


    though the brochure states the capacity of the GM-B is 2-15 litres, the minimum batch size in practise is about 300 ml (the mixer head won't physically fit into anything smaller)
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • MakingSkincareMakingSkincare Member, Professional formulator
    edited January 2015
    IGisele - I've written reviews of the IKA and Caframo and recommended alternatives in this post - https://chemistscorner.com/cosmeticsciencetalk/discussion/95/industrial-mixer-for-small-scale-manufacturer-emulsions
    Jane Barber
    www.makingskincare.com
    www.learncosmeticformulation.com (free online course)
    Formulation discussion forum (18,000 members): www.facebook.com/groups/makingskincare/
  • IGiseleIGisele Member, PCF student
    Thanks @MakingSkincare, I have read your comments in another post. So you think Caframo mixer is good? I see you put emphasis on max torque. Is it more important that speed? 
    I see you mentioned Caframo Universal Model BDC3030. http://www.caframo.com/cosmetic/lab_products_hightorque_universalBDC3030.php. Do you think it's a good all purpose mixer for start-up? Thank you!
  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Speed is how fast the motor will turn, torque is how much force/strength it turns with. Without enough torque, speed will not do anything much. 

    For example, in the US, we have some hand-held battery-powered fans for the summertime that turn at very high speeds - but if you were to try to get them to move anything thicker than air, they would come to a screeching halt. The same principles apply to lab mixers.
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • Good evening from Greece,
    i would like to add a similar question,about this topic..
    i think the best way to mixing, is with in a vacuum environment,so i have decided to get a vacuum
    homogenizer mixer (correct me if  i am wrong)
    Could anyone inform me how many mbars (or bars) must the vacuum should be in order to have
    correct production?
    I am asking this because i have found a mixer that works at a very high level ,almost 900-950mbars
    (close to absolute vacuum) and i am afraid possible conversion of the phases.
    I am not going to homogenize in this mixer, i just want to mix base creams with some active 
    ingredients which might to be volatiles( essential oils,perfumes...)
    thanks
    panos
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