perfume selection

For face wash/ cleanser./ for charcoal face wash.
what type of perfume is preferable oil soluble or water soluble?
Is perfume performance pH dependent?
What factor matters for long lasting effect of Perfume? 
Any guidance?

Thank you.

Comments

  • For face wash/ cleanser./ for charcoal face wash.
    what type of perfume is preferable oil soluble or water soluble?
    Is perfume performance pH dependent?
    What factor matters for long lasting effect of Perfume? 
    Any guidance?

    Thank you.
    I'd say water soluble but I could be mistaken. Charcoal likes to 'mop up' bits and pieces and, I believe has a greater affinity for hydrophobic portions. I.e., oily stuffs are more likely to be absorbed (I believe, worth double-checking).
    Perfume may be pH dependent, that will depend on the aromachemical being utilised. This can always be checked with suppliers - for face-washes and suchlike at approx pH 5-6 you shouldn't have much issue. The performance, i.e. how long it lasts, probably isn't pH dependent however, unless the aromachemicals react negatively at low/high pH through dissociation or suchlike (but typically unlikely at mildly acidic pHs).
    Factors - the aromachemicals in question. E.g. vanillin or oud can act as fixatives, and there are other non-scented fixatives that can improve duration of scent. Typically, more volatile moieties last less but project more (i.e. you'll smell them further away). Lastly, concentration of perfume in the product will have an impact. The general rule is that the more concentrated, the lower the projection but the greater the longevity. This is also dependent on the volatility of the components, so this would be the aspect to investigate.

    For what it's worth, I personally wouldn't want a face-wash that is as strong as a 'typical' eau de toilette. You'll have to be mindful of allergenic ingredients also and their implications in labelling of your product.
  • Helpful info
    Thank you @Benz3ne.
    Mine perfume is oil soluble. 0.2% not effective.
    I know today fragrance free products are trending. But mild perfume required.  that likes most consumers in our country.
    I am going to try water soluble.
  • Cafe33Cafe33 Member
    I produce a charcoal face wash product and I use Rosemary essential oil in the product. It also acts as a good claim ingredient in terms of being good for oily skin. I found that I needed to use a larger amount than initially thought. I am talking about 0.5% EO to 0.25% activated carbon. 

    As far as your ideas for a long lasting perfume, typically and especially when it comes to a rinse off product, you are looking at log P values - the higher the better. It's water solubility basically determines how it is likely to be rinsed off down the drain or by contrast stick and bind to your skin. 

    So in my opinion, your idea of a water soluble perfume is actually the exact opposite of what you need!  

    thegoodscentscompany.com

    They provide a good database for many scent ingredients.

    Here's a profile for one of my favorite scents, ethylene brassylate.

    ethylene brassylate, 105-95-3 (thegoodscentscompany.com)

    The log P is very high. If you scroll down you will see that they also measure substantively 

    Odor Strength:medium
    Substantivity:208 hour(s) at 100.00 %
     
    You also have to consider volatility. Most profiles include vapor pressure info although musks like ethylene brassylate do not have that info included. 

    I order many fine fragrances (50g lots) and the ones I like I ask for a compositional breakdown. I then map out each chemicals and its properties in excel of course.     

  • I think i need to double the perfume 0.4%. (charcoal:0.2%)
    Trying your recommendation.

    We have limited info from the supplier.

    Thank you  @c@Cafe33.   
  • Cafe33 said:
    As far as your ideas for a long lasting perfume, typically and especially when it comes to a rinse off product, you are looking at log P values - the higher the better. It's water solubility basically determines how it is likely to be rinsed off down the drain or by contrast stick and bind to your skin. 

    So in my opinion, your idea of a water soluble perfume is actually the exact opposite of what you need!      

    A very valid and valuable point well made, thanks Cafe33. 
    Considering this, I'm inclined to revise my thoughts and agree that more is more, as long as the amount of charcoal present (and subsequently the amount of essential/perfume oils present) don't push allergenic compounds' levels over any applicable thresholds.
    Oil-based does sound like the way to go in this case, so my apologies for the misdirection above.
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