Consumer perception regarding chelators.......

I am putting the finishing touches on a high end face cream.  I have tried to keep things on the natural side, including using sodium phytate vs the EDTA that I have used in other products.

I have found that with EDTA, the pH lands right where I want it....no adjustment needed.  Using the sodium phytate even at .2%, I have to adjust the pH down.

I asked a few skin care junkies....and they seemed to not really care what chelator was in there....they focused on other ingredients.

Just wanted to hear from the group....if there is much in the way of negative perception with EDTA.  Or maybe I will ask it in reverse.... Is there any marketing benefit of using sodium phytate?

Comments

  • From my limited experience in marketing - negative perception with EDTA - no or should I say not yet.
    There's Origins with no EDTA.  Some cream from Lancôme, Clarins, etc. with no EDTA.
    Is there any marketing benefit of using sodium phytate? all-natural claim is a big plus if it does perform well.
  • @Graillotion The main issue with EDTA (and related) is the low biodegradability. A good compromise are similar and yet more biodegradable molecules like MGDA or GLDA. Buy yeah, sodium phytate has the lead if your communication is based on "natural". 
  • I am trying to buy as few ingredients as possible so I don’t end up with an entire kitchen full of garbage that I do not use, but one thing that I felt I had to get in order to be an all-natural baby was sodium phytate....which of course ropes you in to getting citric acid.  I’m not happy that I will have ounces and ounces of the stuff left over as I use it in such minute amounts, but whatever.  

    What pH are you going for? I think my requirements are only that the formulation be below 6, and in my most recent test case, I did not have to add any citric acid when using sodium phytate at 0.2%.  I believe the unscientific paper strips give me a reading a 5.5 to 6.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited November 2020
    suswang8 said:
    I am trying to buy as few ingredients as possible so I don’t end up with an entire kitchen full of garbage that I do not use, but one thing that I felt I had to get in order to be an all-natural baby was sodium phytate....which of course ropes you in to getting citric acid.  I’m not happy that I will have ounces and ounces of the stuff left over as I use it in such minute amounts, but whatever.  

    What pH are you going for? I think my requirements are only that the formulation be below 6, and in my most recent test case, I did not have to add any citric acid when using sodium phytate at 0.2%.  I believe the unscientific paper strips give me a reading a 5.5 to 6.
    Because of the B3 in the formula...I am shooting for the 5.5 to 6 range.  I end up at almost 8 as my starting point.

    I use a meter.  Not sure how much I would rely on strips.  :D

    One way to look at things that are used at such low use rates, if I am promoting being 97.2% natural based ingredients....how is changing that to 97.0% really going to alter the sales or perception of the product?  Not like EDTA is toxic.

    I work under the auspices that 100% is very difficult to obtain, so I take it where I can, and leave it where I can't.

  • In terms of marketing benefits of sodium phytate, see here 
    https://www.ulprospector.com/documents/1197592.pdf?bs=10735&b=332188&st=20&r=na&ind=personalcare

    Other similar ingredients that have perhaps the similar benefits would be the materials made from rice bran, which can include inositol or perhaps phytic acid. 
  • jemolian said:
    In terms of marketing benefits of sodium phytate, see here 
    https://www.ulprospector.com/documents/1197592.pdf?bs=10735&b=332188&st=20&r=na&ind=personalcare

    Other similar ingredients that have perhaps the similar benefits would be the materials made from rice bran, which can include inositol or perhaps phytic acid. 
    Ok...I've never seen anything like that before.... So if I read this right, using this chelator, it also has incredible skin benefits like I might expect from orchid embryos and ground unicorn horn?  Why have I not heard of all these amazing skin benefits before?  Hehehe....why doesn't every product include this?  :)
  • Probably because not many people looked into it i guess? But even with the sodium phytate, normally i don't expect people to use more than 0.2% ? It would still have some moisturization or sebum regulating benefits at lower amounts. 

    I'm interested to use it unfortunately it don't go well with polymerics, which is why i'm using in inositol instead for similar benefits, less the chelating effect. 
  • jemolian said:
    Probably because not many people looked into it i guess? But even with the sodium phytate, normally i don't expect people to use more than 0.2% ? It would still have some moisturization or sebum regulating benefits at lower amounts. 

    I'm interested to use it unfortunately it don't go well with polymerics, which is why i'm using in inositol instead for similar benefits, less the chelating effect. 
    Why do you say it does not go well with polymerics?
    I am using it with them?  What is the issue?  You mean just the whole electrolyte thing?  I think at .2%...it is not an issue.
  • For my moisturizer i'm already using Sepitonic M3 which contains minerals, so if i add any more electrolytes i'd have to change to another co-thickener and up the cost to perhaps Sepimax from Ultrez 20, haha. I don't think there's any issues if i just use the sodium phytate without other electrolytes.
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