GLA carrier oils......

Can you help me sort through the jungle of GLA containing oils.

I would like to add a carrier oil with reasonable levels of GLA's to a face cream.  At this point, I have only ordered one (black currant, not yet received), and in the interest of not having to order them all, I would like to draw on the groups experience.

The drawbacks of the the typical GLA oils seem to be:

Oily feeling
Short shelf life
Odor 

So just curious, I suppose the very essence of GLA's mean the first two issues are in play.  But is there a GLA oil that seems to dodge many of these issues?

I would like one that would be lite, quick absorbing, and offer little odor.  I suspect GLA and those terms might be mutually exclusive.

Thank you for your consideration.

Comments

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Using it at low % and in conjunction with antioxidants and a chelate greatly increases shelf life once formulated. The more stable "GLA oils" usually contain a higher % of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and/or high amounts of antioxidants.
    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are all penetrating skin deep but do so fairly slowly and, since they are very liquid oils usually with C16-20 carbon chains, feel oily/greasy.
    Be careful when reading about 'drying' oils. This term often refers to oils drying (=polymerising) when used as oil paint or varnish. Cosmetic bloggers and copy-pasters think that they do so on skin too. Sure, an oil with good skin resorption will ultimately feel 'dry' and this often coincides with drying oil paints but not always (or rather, many non-drying ones quickly feel dry on skin like macadamia nut oil).
    There's a ton of ingredients and strategies used to correct or mask undesirable effects such as an oily afterfeel.
  • Pharma said:
    Using it at low % and in conjunction with antioxidants and a chelate greatly increases shelf life once formulated. The more stable "GLA oils" usually contain a higher % of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and/or high amounts of antioxidants.
    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are all penetrating skin deep but do so fairly slowly and, since they are very liquid oils usually with C16-20 carbon chains, feel oily/greasy.
    Be careful when reading about 'drying' oils. This term often refers to oils drying (=polymerising) when used as oil paint or varnish. Cosmetic bloggers and copy-pasters think that they do so on skin too. Sure, an oil with good skin resorption will ultimately feel 'dry' and this often coincides with drying oil paints but not always (or rather, many non-drying ones quickly feel dry on skin like macadamia nut oil).
    There's a ton of ingredients and strategies used to correct or mask undesirable effects such as an oily afterfeel.
    Thank you for your enlightening comments.
    I was aware, since I primarily work with the 'dry' oils, that they are VERY soothing to my skin.  And yes, sadly the low end of cosmetics is almost entirely a 'cut and paste' situation.  Whenever I research a new ingredient, I read the same description 10X!
    I appreciate the fact that I can lengthen the shelf life if these more fragile oils with proper formulation.
    Since with the GLA's, I will primarily be seeking 'claim' value, I can keep inclusion low, and they should not alter the feel too much.

    vielen Dank
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