Definition (and rules) for Day Cream and Night Cream?

GraillotionGraillotion Member
edited September 13 in Formulating
As I embark into the unknown....face creams.... I would like a definition or two.  It is hard to hit a goal if one does not set a goal.  If I do not know the definition or parameters I can not set an appropriate goal.

 Within the context of face creams what would be the defining differences between day and night creams... I assume higher oil content...but I am guessing residual shine might not be appropriate in a day cream....but would be quite acceptable in a night cream?

My primary goal is moisturization with reasonable TEWL.  I tend to shy away from components that leave a strong residual shine, feel heavy and draggy, and leave a noticeable film on the skin.  As with all my products....I want that "Ah Hah" moment when the customer first applies the product.

Any other nuances of what a day vs night cream would be...would be much appreciated.

Aloha.

Comments

  • Normally a day cream would be lighter or lower in percentage in terms of lipids or texture. Something that can possibly go before a sunscreen. 

    For the night cream, usually it would be on the heavier side, depending on the lipids of choice, if a day cream is too shiny, the user may also choose to use it at night instead. However they may also choose to use a day cream but add an oil to make it "heavier", so they don't need another cream. 

    If you need examples of real routines, i'd recommend that you take a look at the reddit posts that people lists their routine on the SkincareAddiction or Asianbeauty sub.
  • it's depend on your targeted customers. 
    if they were to wear makeup daily, they tend to want a lighter cream as they will be using sunscreen and makeup after.
    with additional benefits, can make their makeup stay longer, won't ruin their makeup during the day, oil controlled effect, acne friendly, ... etc
    if they don't wear makeup on daily basis, it's ideally good if day cream  have SPF but still feel lighter than sunscreen and not too shiny for natural look.  
  • It’s all about marketing. Having said that it would make sense to have light sensitive ingredients such as retinol in a nigh cream and spf in a day product.
  • It’s all about marketing. Having said that it would make sense to have light sensitive ingredients such as retinol in a nigh cream and spf in a day product.
    I was planning on using Red Raspberry Seed oil for the base of my cream.  I read lots about the natural SPF of that oil?  Is this hype or legit?  Since I will use it as the primary oil....the cream might have nearly 10% of this oil?
  • It depends on how you market it, you won't be able to mention SPF values from it since it requires testing, though you can market it to contain some UV protective properties due to the oil. 

    You can download the full text to take a look: 
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/215523935_Characteristics_of_raspberry_Rubus_idaeus_L_seed_oil
  • It’s all about marketing. Having said that it would make sense to have light sensitive ingredients such as retinol in a nigh cream and spf in a day product.
    What about this for a statement?  Night creams are more likely to contain fatty alcohols, which enhance their richness.  Day creams are less likely to contain fatty alcohols, to keep them light and airy?

    I have seen formulas both ways....with FA's and without.
  • I would not rely on spf provided by oil. Perry has a blogpost here on this topic that explains it very well. Long story short, you might get spf 1-2, what does that change?
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    Do not try and do an SPF product with oils. You will not obtain the SPF you believe you will and it would also be an unapproved OTC.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited September 16
    I would not rely on spf provided by oil. Perry has a blogpost here on this topic that explains it very well. Long story short, you might get spf 1-2, what does that change?
    When you use Aristoflex in a cream emulsion....do you add it to the water or oil....seems like it can be done either way?  Guessing it might not start to gel, if in the oil phase...therefore making it slightly easier to work with?
    Or...are you adding it post-emulsion...as that also seems to be an option?
    Making my first run today...hehhe...fingers crossed.

  • GraillotionGraillotion Member
    edited September 16
    I am very aware of the rules...hehehe.

    SPF will not be advertised or mentioned....just hoping it would come along for the ride!

    I actually have a mosquito lotion I market...and never once use the word 'repel'.... hehehe.

    I am ultra conservative on what my labels say... I let the products speak for themselves.  The stores that sell my products...all offer samples....that is enough to keep me busy!
  • jemolianjemolian Member
    edited September 16
    When you use Aristoflex in a cream emulsion....do you add it to the water or oil....seems like it can be done either way?  Guessing it might not start to gel, if in the oil phase...therefore making it slightly easier to work with? Or...are you adding it post-emulsion...as that also seems to be an option?
    Either one of the three way is fine, depending on your required processes of your ingredient. My Aristoflex has clumped up, so mine is a pre-made gel which i add after emulsification.   
  • Well.... Here is the first shot at it... I guess that CoQ10...Raspberry seed oil, and Rosehip seed oil....colors came through.
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