Emulsifier for facial cream....

GraillotionGraillotion Member
edited August 2020 in Formulating
Just a general question.... My next endeavor I want to attempt is a light facial cream....a day cream I think.  Was just curious as to what some of the go to emulsifiers would be...that can give a light heavenly texture.

I like using Varisoft EQ 65 as the co-emulsifier, so maybe something that will play well with that one.  I also prefer to avoid words like PEG (even though I use 165 in other products), was hoping to avoid that one for a facial product where some consumers might scrutinize the label a little closer.  Rita had come to mind...but not sure if it will provide a light non greasy feel?  But I am still  open to producing a product so wonderful...the consumer might look past some INCI words they cannot pronounce. :)  

Thanks in advance.

Montanov L had also crossed my mind.


Comments

  • jemolianjemolian Member
    edited August 2020
    Normally i'd do light gel creams since it's humid where i am, so my basic format is like this: 
    • 5% - 10% Ester (normally Isononyl Isononanoate)
    • 3% Lotionpro 165 or similar, Montanov L is fine as well
    • 2% Cetyl Alcohol
    • 1% Aristoflex AVC or 0.75% Sodium Carbomer
    • Glycerin with Betaine
    • Preservative 
    I don't use Glycols or Diols since they make my face tingle. Other Montanovs should be fine. It's replaceable with Montanov 202 if you want a matte finish. 
  • jemolian said:
    Normally i'd do light gel creams since it's humid where i am, so my basic format is like this: 
    • 5% - 10% Ester (normally Isononyl Isononanoate)
    • 3% Lotionpro 165 or similar, Montanov L is fine as well
    • 2% Cetyl Alcohol
    • 1% Aristoflex AVC or 0.75% Sodium Carbomer
    • Glycerin with Betaine
    • Preservative 
    I don't use Glycols or Diols since they make my face tingle. Other Montanovs should be fine. It's replaceable with Montanov 202 if you want a matte finish. 
    Thank you for your response.  I have most of those items on hand.
    I will experiment.
  • Sucrose Stearate makes nice light creams from my experience. 
  • lushderma said:
    Sucrose Stearate makes nice light creams from my experience. 
    Used as a co-emulsifier, or a primary?

    Thank you for your comment.

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Primary or co-emulsifier ;) .
    I like it though I have the impression that it tends to soaping (or lack the knowledge or silicones to avoid it).
  • suswang8suswang8 Member
    Hi, @Pharma.
    I am experimenting with sucrose stearate now, and the particular variety I am using is food grade/edible.
    Should one have concerns about this emulsifier being "bug food," not just because it might be food grade, per se, but perhaps because it is partially derived from sugar?  Thank you.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Food grade sucrose stearate often consists of a higher % of sucrose distearate (which has an approximate HLB of 6) or broader blends of different molecules whereas cosmetic grades come for example as 'HLB 11' or 'HLB 15'. Meaning, these cosmetic grades are either 1:1 sucrose monostearate to distearate or 70% monostearate, respectively (however, anything from 10 to >80% monostearate is available). As a consequence, you can't exchange food grade with cosmetic grades just like that.
    Here some reading: CLICK, CLACK, and CLOCK.
  • suswang8suswang8 Member
    Thanks very much.  So no concern about this ingredient being "bug food"?
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Well... there are just a very few synthetic materials where we haven't found a microbe which can and will, in one way or another, eat it :smiley: .
    To my knowledge, sucrose stearate isn't especially prone to be 'bug food'. Ingredients of concern usually provide nutrients which are in limited supply without them. This includes nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, minerals and trace elements likely including potassium, as well as vitamins and related growth promoting compounds. Sucrose stearate is sugar and fat, two carbon and oxygen sources already present in ample supply but which on their own would not suffice for growth.
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