Sodium cocoyl isethionate

Hello awesome people,

I've recently started to work with SCI and I'm wondering, what is the minimum input of SCI, to be able to thicken the product with a salt? 
I'm trying to do "very mild baby foam gentle" cleanser for my friend and don't really want to thicken it with any gum or cellulose ( well, will do if neccessary :) ). I would like to take the advantage of the salt. Is there any easy answer to this? 

Thank you so much! And thanks for this forum, I'm super enjoying it :)
P.

Comments

  • There’s an easy answer. SCI isn’t supposed to be used at aqueous products at any significant percentage to make it primary surfactant. It will precepitate.
  • PaprikPaprik Member
    There’s an easy answer. SCI isn’t supposed to be used at aqueous products at any significant percentage to make it primary surfactant. It will precepitate.
    Thank you for your reply. I really appreciate that.

    Would you please recommend alternative to that? Or what would be the maximum of SCI in the formula to have is stable? 

  • There’s an easy answer. SCI isn’t supposed to be used at aqueous products at any significant percentage to make it primary surfactant. It will precepitate.
    Is it possible to use SCI as a tertiary surfactant in a liquid skin or hair cleanser and still achieve a mostly clear product (lower precipitation probability)?

    I have seen a MakingCosmetics surfactant blend (I think the primary was decyl glucoside) that is marketed for use in clear liquid surfactant systems.

    I’m working on a hair/body wash commissioned formula for a nonprofit (use case - portable foot-pump hand wash stations in homeless encampments) and the combination of mildness, rinsability with less water, and lower materials cost are all issues.

    (I would post a separate thread, except this already exists specifically to discuss SCI)
  • If it comes in a blend it’s probably at a low % and you should be able to use it. 
  • @grayautumnday
    By the way, if it’s for non for profit  and you care about cost you might want to go SLES/CAPB route. It would be easier to make and economical. It can be mild, just don’t make active surfactant mass too high and use a little more of CAPB. Plus you can thicken it with salt. With glucosides you would need additional ingredients to thicken the product.
  • Iselux is not for your application. I tried it and decided that it was too expensive by far.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • SCI is mild but easily precipitated on liquid formula. SCI better for solid soaps, if you insist on using SCI
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