10% aha peel formula

Hello everyone,I wanted to formulate a facial peel that would cause dead skin to peel when left on the face for maximum 10mins,I formulated one with lactic Acid and it didn’t cause any peeling even after left on for 15 mins and rubbed off, (before rinsing)
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heres my formula:
deionized water:50%
Rose water:26%
Lactic acid:10%
Propylene glycol:5%
Salicylic acid:2%
Glycerine:4%
Glycyrrhiza glabra:2%
Xanthan gum:0.5%
Germal plus:0.5%

I would appreciate any help and feedbacks,

Comments

  • Are you trying to skin yourself alive? If that’s not your goal, neutralise that to ph 3 and don’t rub your skin that was just exposed to a chemical peel. Skin isn’t supposed to fall off in chunks, that’s not how acid peels work.
  • Are you trying to skin yourself alive? If that’s not your goal, neutralise that to ph 3 and don’t rub your skin that was just exposed to a chemical peel. Skin isn’t supposed to fall off in chunks, that’s not how acid peels work.
    I laughed so hard, no, I wasn’t trying to skin myself alive,I saw an aha peel with almost exact formula used that way,and the skin actually peeled gently and looked very nice afterwards, I just thought mine would have the same effect,my ph was 3 
  • @Haleemah the peel that actually causes desquamation (100% of the time) about two days after is trichloroacetic acid. I do that every couple months and my skin does fall off in chunks :) it is not suitable for darker skin, however, because of high risk of hyperpigmentation from the peel and subsequent UV damage. If you have darker skin, stick to AHAs or Salicylic Acid peels. And consult a dermatologist or esthetician (always) just to make sure you’re skin can handle any of the peels you want to attempt. 

    AHAs normally do not cause visible peeling. It’s more gentle. It’s interesting that you saw that on someone with lactic acid. Usually, that’s not to be expected. There are 20% glycolic acid creams, and I would not expect them to make you peel off.

    As for the pH for the peel, I don’t know if it will actually skin you alive to have a lower than 3 pH solution. It likely won’t go below 1.5. And a higher pH will definitely make the peel less “effective”, meaning that the percentage of the acid that is active will be lower, so you may need a 20% solution of lactic acid at pH 3 to match the strength of a 10% solution at pH 1.5. (I didn’t do the actual calculations here, so don’t quote me on this, but you get the idea).

    There are peels in the market at pH < 3, as low as 1.5. You have to remember that for these acids to penetrate into the stratum corneum more effectively (and quickly) they need to be in their free acid form. Hence, a lower pH will maintain more of the acid in it’s “active“ form. It is likely the lower the pH the more peeling you could observe (and redness, stinging). It’s a less gentle exfoliation. 

    On the other hand, with higher pH, a hypothesis is that as some of the free acid is absorbed into deeper layers. So, when the pH of an acid is the same as the pKa, 50% of that acid will be in free form. If we have 10 units, 5 will be free form. If 2 get absorbed, you end up with 8 units left, of which now only 4 are free. The another 2 absorb, then you have 3 free... does this make sense? 


  • 10% lactic acid should lower the ph below 3. How are you measuring it? AHAs shouldn’t cause significant peeling and 10% lactic can be used as leave on, but nevertheless ph is crucial and damage can be made even with 10% concentration.

    re TCA peels, these are more serious and in general should be applied by dermatologist. I saw it on Amazon but would not risk
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • @Microformulation agreed for cosmetics.

    But I’m unsure that applies to professional or medical grade peels where an actual controlled “burn” is desired. Usually these kind of peels will come with very strict after care, and down time.

    That being said, if formulating at home or a cosmetic for commercialization, don’t listen to me! 😉
  • Thank you so much everyone for contributing,it makes so much sense now, these feedbacks have been really helpful, I’ll do Some more research and invest in a good ph meter before I finally conclude on the product. Thanks again 
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    @letsalcido Yes, any products that fall outside of these guidelines must be "For Professional Use Only."
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • @Haleemah @Microformulation you can definitely use higher than 10% AHAs in your products without the "for professional use only" wordings. The recommendation on the FDA website is just a guideline. Lots of brands use much higher % of AHAs. But they generally also have a base that neutralizes a lot of it and hence is at a higher pH than 3.5.  
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Lal8899 - just because you can do something doesn't mean you should do it. There is no good reason to formulate outside the boundaries of the CIR recommendations.

    And if you are selling the product saying the "FDA website is just a guideline" doesn't mean they won't inspect your company, fine you, and shut you down if you can't prove that your product is safe. If you are not following the CIR recommendations, you won't be able to prove safety to the satisfaction of the FDA.  Additionally, you set yourself up for a lawsuit by any consumer who might get harmed by your product.

    Bottom line: not following the guidelines for safety is a bad idea.
  • @Perry Yes, of course. 100% agree with you. Companies definitely have to prove that it's safe for consumer use. I just meant that there are many companies that do use over 10% AHA. PC is a good example of that. 
  • there are some companies saying it is 10% or 5% or.. but actually is 5% sollution of 50% pure ingredients for example which actually makes it 2.5% pure..
  • Yes, it could be buffered and neutralised to the point where AHA is not even active. 
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