SK-Influx - Heat Phase?

Hello,

Should SK Influx be incorporated prior to heating? I've found some conflicting information.

Thank you so much.

Comments

  • chemicalmattchemicalmatt Member, Professional Chemist
    Nope. Ceramides don't like heat. Add to o/w emulsion during cooling process below 50C. IF using in w/o use in a low energy (RT) inverse emulsifier system like Abil EM or DC 5225C. 
  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    The problem is when SK INFLUX is added to the cool down phase, it reduces viscosity drastically.

    I'm using Emulsifying Wax NF and Cetyl Alcohol.

    What if I incorporate into my water phase but only heat to 130F? Would that work? Or is that still too hot for SK INFLUX?
  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    Thank you so much by the way.
  • czkldczkld Member
    If you're making it for personal use (and not as a marketing gimmick) I'd just recommend you skip it altogether. The % of ceramides in it is not impressive, so I doubt it would facilitate any massive difference in your skin. 
  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    Even if SK INFLUX is 5% of my overall formulation? I read that the SK INFLUX complex is comprised of 50% ceramides. That would give me 2.5% total ceramides. It's for myself for now.
  • Unknown Member
    edited July 23
    I am not sure if this is helpful, as I am also just learning about SK-Influx V but in this DIY serum recipe by the acid queen (Ally Reed of Stratia skin care which has the famous ceramides containing Liquid Gold serum), she used in the water phase that's heated up to 70C.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @driftmark2016 - the reality is that whether you put the ceramides in the formula or not, most people will not notice any difference. In my view, they are simply marketing materials. 

    So, heating them up, even if it chemically degrades the molecules a bit, doesn't really matter.
  • Unknown Member
    @Perry
    I totally understand that view and I respect the fact there just isn't enough research to suggest a meaningful effect, but from my personal experience, a moisturizer containing ceramides has been one of the most helpful products in my routine for me. It's possible it's placebo or the other ingredients are what is making the product really good for my extremely finicky and dry skin, but it's been really helpful to me so I don't want to stop using it. 
  • jemolianjemolian Member
    @emma1985 This is the composition from the SK-Influx Product data record (PDR). I'm not sure where you read that it's 50%. 


  • emma1985emma1985 Member
    Thank you Driftmark!

    Yes I went through countless bottles of Liquid Gold. Thank you for sharing the recipe. 

    By the way I'm having some really good luck with pseudoceramides! Actually I find them more reparative. My understanding is that it's because they can be used in higher concentrations. I'm using Curel Intensive Moisture Cream, which contains pseudoceramides in third place. I highly recommend it! 🙂
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @driftmark2016 - I understand. The placebo effect is strong and many people do need something to inspire hope. 

    But I like to know what it real. In my view, if you made that DIY serum recipe you shared and just didn't put in the ceramides, you would not notice any performance differences.

    This is not to say that I'm a cynic. There is logic to the notion that ceramides could be good for skin. But just because something is logical, doesn't make it true. If there were evidence that ceramides in skin care performed better than just a good moisturizer, I'd be happy to say so. I've just not seen any evidence of it.

    The problem with just believing things without evidence is then people start to layer stories on top of stories. For example, coming up with things they call "pseudoceramides" and then additional stories about how they work better because you can use higher concentrations. It creates a myth that marketers exploit to the detriment of consumers.

    The most likely reason the Curel cream works is because it has Glycerin, Butylene Glycol and a ton of silicones (Dimethicone, cyclomethicone. I don't know if the ceramides in the formula even matter. Perhaps they are just a non-polar material that could be simply replaced with something like cetyl palmitate or even cetyl alcohol.

    Wouldn't this be something you would want to know?
  • czkldczkld Member
    I am not sure if this is helpful, as I am also just learning about SK-Influx V but in this DIY serum recipe by the acid queen (Ally Reed of Stratia skin care which has the famous ceramides containing Liquid Gold serum), she used in the water phase that's heated up to 70C.
    LG is very gimmicky. The sk influx doesn't provide the marketed 3:1:1 molar ratio, and the addition of cholesterol is just driving it further from it..
  • I agree with you czkld, but it's a nice oil serum regardless of the fact that it doesn't have the optimal ratio. In fact I'm not entirely convinced that this magical ratio exists or that it's very important.
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