How much Aloe to add to a face wash?

MJLMJL Member
edited June 14 in Formulating
Hello, 

I am wondering if there is any kind of “standard” or “recommended” amount to consider when adding Aloe Vera to a face wash formula. 

Is 20-30% a ‘normal’ range? Too little? Too much? 

The product I have is Aloe Vera 100x Powder. INCI: Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice (and) Maltodextrin. 

Thanks kindly for your time. 

Comments

  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    edited June 14
    If you add 1% of the powder it will reconstitute to Aloe Vera Leaf Juice.  There is no "normal" amount ... it's as little or as much as you want.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • BelassiBelassi Member
    100% aloe vera concentration can be quite stinging to mucous membranes. In a face wash I can't see a reason for using more than a few percent, it's a rinse off product after all.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • MJLMJL Member
    edited June 15
    @MarkBroussard @Belassi ;
    I am sorry. I should have specified that I don’t mean including 20-30% of the pure 100x powder.

    I meant 20-30% of a 100% aloe solution. So adding 0.2 or 0.3% of the solution, if I am not mistaken... 
  • MJLMJL Member
    So @Belassi, would you say that adding 0.2-0.3% (20-30% total aloe vera juice [in face wash formula]) is far too much, then?
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @MLJ:

    Not at all ... I commonly make surfactants with Aloe Vera Juice instead of water ... there is no "too much".  The maximum amount of powder you would want to add is 1% of 100X
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • MJLMJL Member
    Thank you @MarkBroussard. I appreciate it! 
  • @MLJ:

    Not at all ... I commonly make surfactants with Aloe Vera Juice instead of water ... there is no "too much".  The maximum amount of powder you would want to add is 1% of 100X
    Mark...in my latest creation...I am using Aloe 100X at 1% of added water.  I did this so I could list by 1st ingredient as Aloe Juice instead of water.  If one were to cut the rate below 1% (of water)...can one still list the water as Aloe Juice...or do you lose that right...below 1%?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    edited June 16
    @Graillotion - Listing Aloe first in the way you describe is not in the spirit of the rules and, in my opinion, dubious and unethical business practices. Others might disagree.
  • MarkBroussardMarkBroussard Member, Professional Chemist
    @Graillotion:

    No, that would not be appropriate.  If you have 1.0% 100X or 0.5% 200X Aloe Powder, then it is essentially reconstituted Aloe Vera Juice and you can list it Aloe Juice as your first ingredient.  If it is less than those amount, then it is not fully constituted Aloe Juice.  Now, if you are trying to get Organic Certification, they will reject reconstituted Aloe Juice as being organic ... it has to be the juice itself, not a reconstituted version.

    It's a bit short-sighted, imho, since it is much better for the environment to ship Aloe Powder than bulk Aloe Juice.
    Chemist/Microbiologist formulating in the Organic & Naturals arena under ECOCert/Natural Products Assn/Whole Foods/National Organic Program guidelines focused skincare & haircare products. 

    See website for details www.desertinbloomcosmeticslab.com
  • @Graillotion:

      Now, if you are trying to get Organic Certification, 
    Nope not chasing that at all.

    Thank you.
Sign In or Register to comment.