current questions for skincare formulation

Hello all! brand new to this website but I have been trying to create a face moisturizer that is safe and has a good shelf life. I was wondering about the ingredient sodium anisate and what the dosage for that should be if I want to preserve my face cream containing hyaluronic acid. also how long should I expect it to preserve my product for? for reference here are all of the ingredients I am thinking of using and I would be so grateful if you could let me know if any adverse reactions between ingredients would be present.
-shea butter
-beeswax
-rosemary extract
-matcha powder(is this good idea?)
-seabuckthorn oil
-rosehip seed oil
-tea tree oil
-argan oil
-small amount of castor oil
-jojoba oil
-almond oil
-arrowroot powder
-hyaluronic acid
-sodium anisate (%?) 
Thank you so much for your help I greatly appreciate it!!!

Comments

  • Anhydrous balm with hyaluronic acid?
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @ngarayeva001 is that not good? should I not be adding hyaluronic acid? is there an ingredient in my list that doesn't mesh well with it?
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @ngarayeva001 would it be good idea to switch out hyaluronic acid for niacinimide or should I just keep it anhydrous?
  • It's not that they won't "mesh," it's that hyaluronic acid is water soluble. To incorporate it into your formula, you need water.
    That said, sodium anisate is also water soluble, and probably isn't great as a sole preservative, though without water you don't necessarily need one.
    Your rosemary extract also has a good chance of containing water, so it would violate your anhydrous concept at the least, and totally not mix with your oils either.

    I'm also not sure if this is a "cream" without an emulsifier so much as it is a "body butter" or something... though that may just be semantics.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    If you really want to add sodium anisate, use anisic acid instead. This is the oil-soluble corresponding acid of sodium anisate and also the active form of it.
    Regarding rosemary extract: Go with a CO2 extract which is well soluble in oils. Adding it as an antioxidant is a wise choice, given all the unsaturated fatty acids you have in your product.
    Although matcha powder is very fine, I can imagine that it's going to be gritty in an anhydrous formulation and it will stain it probably rather dirty green instead of green as it would with water based products. I'm not a fan of adding chlorophyll (the reason why matcha is green) due to chemical instability it imparts on the whole formulation.
    Most if not all good and strong humectants (e.g. hyaluronate, urea, glycerol, betaine, just to mention a few) are unfortunately insoluble in oils and fats. Hence, I have to concur with the others that there is no point in adding sodium hyaluronate to a body butter or massage oil. It can only hydrate if water is present and the only water it will get is from absorbing it slowly from skin and air moisture. The feeling of swelling gel crumbs on your skin might not be the most pleasant... Instead, you might want to use an oil soluble emollient/multifunctional such as caprylyl glycol (which is also a preservative and therefore, you could omit anisic acid).
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @Pharma I got rosemary oleoresin extract which I looked up and it says it’s oil soluble I’m hoping that will work too. @alchemist01
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    okay so ill skip the matcha powder, niacinimide, HA, and sodium anisate. thank you so much for your help!! @Pharma @alchemist01
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Melcas said:
    @Pharma I got rosemary oleoresin extract which I looked up and it says it’s oil soluble I’m hoping that will work too. @alchemist01
    It should work.
  • A couple of suggestions. Yes definitely exclude HA, not only it’s watersoluble it needs water to work. You can apply some basic HA serum to a slightly wet skin and to  a dry skin to see the difference. Regarding oils, I don’t know your %, but if you can try to add as little of rosehip oil as possible. It’s very prone to oxidation. You can add tocopherol as antioxidant at 0.1%. It’s oil soluble and what is typically used in such a product. You can add oil soluble actives for the label appeal. I like bisabolol. There’s some evidence  that it reduces inflammation (placebo controlled but not double blinded with relatively small population size). There’s a natural and a synthetic varieties if that’s important. Works at a low amount (the study I read use 0.15%)
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    hello @ngarayeva001! I found a listing on amazon for "pure gold alpha bisabolol essential oil, 100% natural undiluted, 10ml." and was wondering that would be a good option to include in my recipe? Also thank you so much for the great recommendation! Sorry if it seems like a dumb question lol I just like to make sure.
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @ngarayeva001 also I couldn't find on google if there are any possible adverse reactions between bisabolol and any other ingredients, are there any known reactions? I was also looking to add green tea into the moisturizer.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    edited April 24
    Bisabolol is fairly stable and I don't know of any interactions, reactions, or incompatibilities with other common cosmetic ingredients.
  • @Melcas, be very careful with buying ingredients on Amazon. You can only do this if you know the supplier. I found that ingredient out of curiosity but I don't even know what that is. Bisabolol is a constituent of chamomile essential oil but it's not an essential oil on its own. You will get chamomile essential oil of a questionable quality if you are lucky. If you need bisabolol, buy it from lotioncrafter. I assume you are in the US.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    edited April 28
    You really should have some specific purpose for adding every ingredient you use.  That's why I don't understand, why do you have 7 different oils in there and you still want to add more? 

     -seabuckthorn oil
    -rosehip seed oil
    -tea tree oil
    -argan oil
    -small amount of castor oil
    -jojoba oil
    -almond oil

    What is the specific purpose you're trying to achieve with each of these oils?  For example, why use Shea butter, Almond oil and Argan oil when they are all made up of a blend of C18 and C16? 
  • Unknown Member
    I suspect it may have a business/marketing purpose. I do think there has to be an easier way.
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @ngarayeva001wow thank you so much for  this info I was kind of suspicious about buying ingredients off amazon especially active ones like that but didn’t know where else to buy these from
  • MelcasMelcas Member
    @Perry hello! Yeah I streamlined my real ingredients list a lot from that initial one only including Shea butter, sweet almond, squalane, argan , and jojoba oils. For right now I guess I’m just trying to make an recipe with things that I know work for my skin and have good benefits. Don’t know very much so I guess I’m just making it up as I go along. Any suggestions help!
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