Body Wash pH

Our Body wash pH is 5.5 to 6, but we have found that at this pH it is found very slippery on the skin i.e. it takes 3 to 4 water washes to clean. We increased pH to 8.5 and found the slippery effect is little bit solved but is this pH (8.5) is good for the skin? Because many literature says that the ideal pH for skin care should be around 5 to 6.5. Can any body please guide.. Thank yo in advance.

Comments

  • I would personally not use a body wash with pH 8.5.

    I would keep the pH at 5.5-6 and try to correct the slip using other methods.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    There are better ways to fix the slippery problem than raising the pH that high. But without knowing what is in your formula, there isn't much advice that can be given.
  • Thanks for reply.

    SLES (28%)--40
    CAPB (32%)--14
    Na Sarcocinate (30%)--5
    Glycirine -1
    EDTA-0.2
    Na.Benzoate-0.2
    NaOH
    Citric Acid

  • We saponify oils to produce liquid washes with pH around 9.5. We have been producing for about 20 years for our own label and OEM/Private Label. This pH has never been a problem.

    Going back to my research scientist days a long time ago, I was doing a lot of mathematical modeling for the skin. The mantle recovers quickly. Plus, the chemistry of cleaning favours a higher pH. It's a wash-off product, so the body wash is not in contact with the skin long.

    Not a popular view. But that's what we do.
    Dr. Mike Thair
    Cofounder & Chief Formulator
    Indochine Natural
  • Maybe what you call slippery is your own perception? People who got used to using alkaline soaps often don’t like the feel that remains after surfactants but it’s just a matter of a habit. There’s nothing wrong with your formula except for the fact that sodium benzoate isn’t a great choice for this type of product. It requires low pH (and pH of surfactant products might shift with time) and you need to supplement it with another preservative. 
  • Drop the glycerin (or reduce it to claim ingredient levels, 0.01% or so). It does nothing and may leave a sticky afterfeel.

    You can try reducing SLES to about 8% active ingredient, using about 28.6% )at 28% concentration).

  • Use a higher quality surfactant for the base. I hate SLES because it has horrible sensorials: short-flow.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Thank you very much all masters for your valuable comments.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    @Belassi what would you recommend then if not SLES as a high quality surfactant. You know blends are still not such a craze after all given the cost constraints.
  • ALES, for one. Akypo RLM-45, another.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Thanks @Belassi ;
  • Gunther said:
    Drop the glycerin (or reduce it to claim ingredient levels, 0.01% or so). It does nothing and may leave a sticky afterfeel.

    You can try reducing SLES to about 8% active ingredient, using about 28.6% )at 28% concentration).

    Thank you..
     We can reduce SLES and make a trial batch, but do we need to keep rest ingredients as it is? I mean majorly for CAPB and Na Sarcocinate to be kept as it is or should we increase them to meet 100% final volume.
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