Anti-Pollution

I read the article talking about Anti-pollution by using natural ingredients. Anyone has experiences. please share your experiences and is it legally claim anti-pollution in the cosmetic products such facial cream?

Comments

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Since you can define pollution however you like, I don't see any problem with the legality of making an anti-pollution claim.

    I'm not sure what you're asking about though. Anti-pollution is just a marketing trend which is rather easy to adapt a standard cosmetic formula to make anti-pollution claims. There is nothing particularly special about anti-pollution formulas.
  • GuntherGunther Member
    edited November 2019
    Any film on skin can work as an anti-pollution barrier.

    You can devise a test where you apply a petrolatum or silicone containing skin cream, then spray some dilute acids (or other chemicals) to mimic acid rain
    The petrolatum or silicone film should lessen the skin damage.

    No animal testing please.
  • smoksmok Member
    edited November 2019
    Gunther said:
    Any film on skin can work as an anti-pollution barrier.

    You can devise a test where you apply a petrolatum or silicone containing skin cream, then spray some dilute acids (or other chemicals) to mimic acid rain
    The petrolatum or silicone film should lessen the skin damage.

    No animal testing please.
    Vaseline can be used as protection against chemical irritation (detergents, cleaning agents)
  • I don't know about acid rain but some diluted acids are great for skin :)
  • FDA in my country regulates that if any product claime anti-pollution then they have to prove that they wash away any dust, impurities and heavy metal (either rinse off or leave on).
    This claim could be substantiated by adding some chelating agent or film former or adsorbent that effectively bind any metal. (Dust and common air impurities could be easily washed away by surfactant)

    The other alternative is the claim that concepting the image to deal with skin damage caused by pollution. Its visible skin damage could be:
    1. Dull oily skin (formulation approach is deep cleansing/exfoliation by scrub)
    2. Dry damage skin (formulatiin approach is restore natural lipid layer by ceramides or some natural extract)
    3. Dehydrated rough skin (improving skin hydration)
    4. Wrinkles (control formation of ROS by antioxidant agent)
    5. Uneven skin tone (add lightening agent)
    6. Loss of skin firmness (promoting collagen synthesis)
    7. Skin redness/acnes (ads inflamamatory active agents)

    this is my experience based on market condition in my region (APAC). do you have any other insight for this? ?
  • @Gurnanda, your country name please?
  • Hydrolyzed Rhodophyceae Extract is an Anti-pollution Active
    Dr. Catherine Pratt
    (B.Sc with HONS I , Ph.D Analytical/Organic Chem and Microbiology), Cosmetic Chemistry IPCS)
  • Hydrolyzed Rhodophyceae Extract is an Anti-pollution Active
    Why it is called so and how it works against pollution ? 
  • GurnandaGurnanda Member
    edited January 24
    You can find more about Hydrolyzed Rhodophyceae Extract in: https://www.seppic.com/how-can-you-purify-and-protect-your-skin-against-microparticles. Again, this raw material suits if you concept your product image to deal with skin damage caused by pollution.

    If you find some material to have direct defense against pollution particle@Dtdang I live in Malaysia.




  • "anti-pollution formulas".... conceptually, moving a bit away from the definition of a cosmetic in my humble opinion.

    Article 2 of the EU Cosmetics Regulation (Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009) incorporates the following definition of a cosmetic product:

    A "cosmetic product" shall mean any substance or mixture intended to be placed in contact with the various external parts of the human body (epidermis, hair system, nails, lips and external genital organs) or with the teeth and the mucous membranes of the oral cavity with a view exclusively or mainly to cleaning them, perfuming them, changing their appearance and/or correcting body odours and/or protecting them or keeping them in good condition.

    The wording "anti-pollution" is simply a marketing trend. Then you tack  "anti-pollution" onto a standard cosmetic formula, then make anti-pollution claims.  Brands who do this, in my opinion, are showing a sign of desperation.
    Dr. Mike Thair
    Cofounder & Chief Formulator
    Indochine Natural
  • @mikethair That passage does mention "and/or protecting them".

    You could say that anti-pollution claim is justifiable because it is protecting the skin/hair from pollutants.
  • Frankly it is embarrassing...
    Dr. Catherine Pratt
    (B.Sc with HONS I , Ph.D Analytical/Organic Chem and Microbiology), Cosmetic Chemistry IPCS)
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