labeling ingredients on my product

If I use something like Baobab protein in a spray mist but the supplier I got the protein from preserved it with benzyl alcohol and potassium benzoate, would I have to factor that into the ingredients label of my finished product?

Comments

  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Yes, you should label those preservatives.

    The purpose of an ingredient list is to let consumers know what chemicals they will be exposed to. If you know there is benzyl alcohol and potassium benzoate in your formula, you have to tell consumers.  And Benzyl Alcohol is a known allergen so it's even more important.
  • Is there anyway to get those kind of ingredients without any added preservatives? I haven't been able to find any and want to try and keep the formula as toxin free as possible with few ingredients 
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    edited September 11
    How are those preservatives"toxic?"  What is their LD50? Benzyl alcohol is an irritant, not really "toxic" per se. 
    Not picking on you, but you need to balance "story" ("natural", "Organic") with cost and performance. A great product is well balanced.
    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • Sorry I'm new and not very good at this. I want it to seem as natural and safe as possible.
  • MicroformulationMicroformulation Member, Professional Chemist
    No offense intended. It is normal that you are initially exposed to sources that espouse "natural" and "chemophobia." As you get deeper into the subject, especially if you formulate (Formulators shouldn't sell and sellers shouldn't Formulate IMHO), you will start to see a great deal of misinformation. If you use a source as a reference, my advice is;
    • Ensure that they have footnotes to reputable Journal sources.
    • The Author has valid credentials.
    • The source is not selling a product as this is a conflict of interest. "Is the information they passing true education or are they trying to sell you a product?"

    markfuller@microformulation.com Microformulation.com Microformulation Cosmetic Consulting provides Custom Formulations for both large Commercial accounts as well as smaller entrepreneurs. We can provide Naturally compliant Formulations under the NSF, NPA, Whole Foods and USDA Organic Certifications. BS.Pharm Albany College of Pharmacy, Union University.
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    Being "natural" and "safe" are two different things. Many "natural" things are not safe and shouldn't be put on people's skin.  

    "Safe" things are ingredients that have been safety tested and been proven to be safe. Both synthetic and natural things have to be tested for safety before being put into cosmetic products.

    Creating products without preservatives is not safe.
  • Thank you both for your responses! I'll definitely look into this a lot more and get a little more educated.
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