What is the best preservation system for a toner using ionic silver and colloidal gold and platinum

I want to use minimum 15ppm ionic silver often presented as colloidal silver but that doesn't actually have the nano particles for a toner, I also want to add true colloidal gold and platinum in small percentages (5 to 15%) , with an hydrosol, methyl sulfonyl (MSM)  and natural solubiliser for essential oils (Symbiosolv Caprylyl/Capryl Glucoside; Aqua; Sodium Cocoyl Glutamate; Glyceryl Caprylate; Citric Acid; Polyglyceryl-6 Oleate; Sodium Surfactin)
Would potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate be enough or even Leuconostoc/Radish Root Ferment Filtrate? What else do you suggest I'm not against phenoxyethanol and other synthetic preservatives but I just want to know the natural options available for silver gold and platinum stability. Thanks.

Comments

  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    True colloidal gold and platinum are stable no matter what. Colloidal and ionic silver are highly susceptible to UV light and oxygen and ionic silver does potentially reduce to metallic silver in the presence of certain antioxidants and/or other ingredients.
    Do not use Leuconostoc or other protein containing ingredients because they inactivate each other.
  • chemicalmattchemicalmatt Member, Professional Chemist
    How bout just using more silver ion as silver chloride - a preservative in itself?!
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Forgot to mention (thanks @chemicalmatt for the reminder): Silver chloride is insoluble and inactive. Your greatest enemy you're highly likely to encounter is salt (sodium chloride) since it is a very common contaminant. If you're going with 15 ppm silver ions, ~7.5 ppm salt will annihilate any effect (except the claims).
    If you're really adding 15% platinum, then your cream will probably be i) the most expensive on earth and ii) be the only super expensive cream which really deserves the price tag. You might consider adding just 15 ppm (=10'000 times less) for claim reasons. High amounts of colloidal gold and especially platinum are likely to give your cream an ugly grey hue. If you want golden sparks, add plated gold ;) .
  • How bout just using more silver ion as silver chloride - a preservative in itself?! 
    Thanks for you reply that's what I initally wanted to do but I wasn't sure it was going to be enough.  :)
  • Pharma said:
    Forgot to mention (thanks @chemicalmatt for the reminder): Silver chloride is insoluble and inactive. Your greatest enemy you're highly likely to encounter is salt (sodium chloride) since it is a very common contaminant. If you're going with 15 ppm silver ions, ~7.5 ppm salt will annihilate any effect (except the claims).
    If you're really adding 15% platinum, then your cream will probably be i) the most expensive on earth and ii) be the only super expensive cream which really deserves the price tag. You might consider adding just 15 ppm (=10'000 times less) for claim reasons. High amounts of colloidal gold and especially platinum are likely to give your cream an ugly grey hue. If you want golden sparks, add plated gold ;) .
    Thanks for your replies, I meant 10% gold and 5%platinum =15% but you're right I might leave the platinum out, I love the pink hue of 10ppm colloidal gold in a toner aside from its known benefits, I only was interested in adding platinum because I read a study that said it works like a hydrophilic version of co enzyme q10 internally but I'm in the early stage of devlopment and research. I know of an American brand that sells a clear toner with a silver, gold, platinum and copper complex for 70 US dollars but I don't know the percentage in the formulation, eco-luxe brand May Lindstrom also sells her toner in the same price range with just colloidal silver as the 2nd ingredient and sole preservative but she's had stability issues with other products containing silver.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    ...I meant 10% gold and 5%platinum =15% ...
    That means 10 grams gold and 5 grams platinum in a 100 g jar = 500.- $ for the gold and 150.- $ for the platinum (which is currently cheaper than gold) = 650 $ just for the metals and your jar will be comparatively small considering the hight density of said metals ;) .
  • Pharma said:
    ...I meant 10% gold and 5%platinum =15% ...
    That means 10 grams gold and 5 grams platinum in a 100 g jar = 500.- $ for the gold and 150.- $ for the platinum (which is currently cheaper than gold) = 650 $ just for the metals and your jar will be comparatively small considering the hight density of said metals ;) .
    I might not use the right words (English isn't my 1st language) I already consume 10ppm colloidal gold that I buy for 13,98 € / 100ml on a reputable site that offers wholesale prices for professionals so even cheaper I was thinking just adding 10 ml of this solution to a 100ml toner with an hydrosol and ionic silver and possibly a bit of platinum from same supplier could be interesting. I might stick with a traditional natural formulation with plant extracts lol.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Ah, you mean 10 and 5 % of a dilution! Makes more sense now.
    If you want to add those, be my guest, there's nothing special to consider with gold and platinum.
  • Pharma said:
    Ah, you mean 10 and 5 % of a dilution! Makes more sense now.
    If you want to add those, be my guest, there's nothing special to consider with gold and platinum.
    you mean they won't do anything to the skin? I'm asking because sites I follow claim colloidal gold enhances penetration of actives among other claims based on studies for what it does internally. If so I'd rather invest in other ingredients.
  • PharmaPharma Member, Pharmacist
    Gold nano-particles are of great interest for drug delivery/pharmaceuticals (i.v., jet injection...) but the used particles aren't made that easily as common "colloidal gold" and they're neither coated by simply mixing stuff in a blender.
    What exactly happens with the particles, I don't know... they're likely going somewhere and just stay there till death??? Unlikely to happen in a topical product.
  • Pharma said:
    Gold nano-particles are of great interest for drug delivery/pharmaceuticals (i.v., jet injection...) but the used particles aren't made that easily as common "colloidal gold" and they're neither coated by simply mixing stuff in a blender.
    What exactly happens with the particles, I don't know... they're likely going somewhere and just stay there till death??? Unlikely to happen in a topical product.
    Ok thanks for your input I appreciate it.
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