Adding fruit/vegetable purees/juices

JanhaviJanhavi Member
Hello All, I am from a non chemistry background and new to cold process soap making. Many people add fruit/vegetable purees/juices,milk, beer, wine etc. to lye for making lye water. I wish to know if the skin benefitting properties of fruit/vegetable purees/juices,milk, beer, wine etc are retained by doing so or  lost.  Should these food items be added  after saponification? Thanks. 

Comments

  • The questions you should ask yourself:

    1) Is there a proof that the above-mentioned foods have any beneficial effect for human skin in undiluted form?
    2) If so, what compounds are responsible for beneficial effect (proteins, amino acids, minerals present in that food)?
    3) What does pH 14 do to those compounds?
    4) Unnecessary, however, would those potential beneficial compounds have any effect in a rinse off product?
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    @Janhavi - No, skin is not benefiting from putting fruit/vegetable purees/juices in soap. These are marketing gimmicks.

  • If I may add, skin is not benefiting from those in general. Unless you eat a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables. 
  • AzizAziz Member
    The questions you should ask yourself:

    1) Is there a proof that the above-mentioned foods have any beneficial effect for human skin in undiluted form?
    2) If so, what compounds are responsible for beneficial effect (proteins, amino acids, minerals present in that food)?
    3) What does pH 14 do to those compounds?
    4) Unnecessary, however, would those potential beneficial compounds have any effect in a rinse off product?
    May be his question about saponifications . If you use glycerin , milk or other things instead of water , definitely you will get a difference. Question is , if this difference make any benifits to the users. Soap with goat milk and glycerin is soft and smooth.  
    When you bring the term ' Rinse off ' , you have to consider smoothness , softness etc.
    Some people like oily Dove soap where as some people even use cloth washing soap , both do the job in this rinse off job . 
  • MajmanMajman Member
    So @ngarayeva001 and @Perry companies like glow recipe with sold out products using watermelon juices in their products (and who showed how their products are made)  is pure marketing gimmicks? 
  • @Majman , fruits are neither functional ingredient nor aesthetic modifiers, those are claim ingredients.
    The first thing that comes to my mind is that fruits in skincare is a preservation nightmare. I  watched a video showing how they make that glow mask with watermelon. They put pieces of fruits into a barrel with some liquid and say they preserve it for a month before adding to the lotion. I really wonder what preservatives are in that barrel and why they need a month. 
    Is anyone aware what preservation technique is that? https://youtu.be/Rzygqzim35A
    Scroll to minute 2:00.
  • MajmanMajman Member
    I saw the video too @ngarayeva001 Hence my wanting to make a cleanser with watermelon juice but also lost at what sort of preservative they used in the video. I'd had the idea about using juices but thought they'll be sticky. So would u say that all that they do is just a ploy cos that's an awful lot of watermelons wasted. And several proclaim it works and actually sold out. 
  • SibechSibech Member, Professional Chemist
    Without knowing what they have in their "preservative" my guess would be glycols and an acid. Waiting for a month could be to  1) Improve the story or 2) allow for some of the water in the melon to be drawn out of the fruit and partially replaced by the glycols.
    Dabbling Formulator — Qualified Cosmetic Safety Assessor — experienced in claim substantiation & EU regulatory affairs.
  • MajmanMajman Member
    So technically it works then given the wait list and selling out back to back
  • Well the watermelon glow mask is actually quite nice but really it has nothing to do with the watermelon (mostly water, glycerin, AHAs). The water is just a claims thing. I don't know whats happening in that video considering that on the LOI for the glow mask there is no preservative. Maybe this information was miss represented in the video and they are just extracting the 'goods' from the watermelon. They cut it into slices yet in the barrel its in little balls so clearly there are some process steps missing. The mask works well as a light gel overnight with glycolic/lactic acid for light exfoliation. Glow Recipe products are also very hyped so I'm not convinced its due to their use of fruit juices. Also fragrance is on this list of this particular product so the watermelon isn't really imparting much fragrance either.
    Cosmetic Product Development
    Sussex Research Laboratories Inc.
    www.sussex-research.com
  • Janhavi said:
    Hello All, I am from a non chemistry background and new to cold process soap making. Many people add fruit/vegetable purees/juices,milk, beer, wine etc. to lye for making lye water. I wish to know if the skin benefitting properties of fruit/vegetable purees/juices,milk, beer, wine etc are retained by doing so or  lost.  Should these food items be added  after saponification? Thanks. 
    They might have a chance in (leave on) skin creams
    but not in soaps, because they are in contact with the skin only for a really short time.
  • Unfortunately the product's success has nothing to do with the science. As the founder of Revlon said, we don't sell lipsticks, we sell dreams. People buy cosmetics for how it makes them feel. Active ingredients (even AHAs) take some time to do their magic and businesses don't have that time because it takes just a couple of minutes to take decision to buy, and that decision is taken based on the experiences (smell, touch, packaging) not objective facts. So whether we like it or not, we can't ignore the importance of marketing story (watermelon in this case). The most important thing for a formulator is to make sure that the claim ingredient is preserved well and doesn't mess up with the performance of the ingredients that are actually responsible for the performance (glycerin, oils, AHAs).
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