water used in cosmetics manufacturing ..help please:(

I have a problem in water treatment station and may stay for along .. what can I use instead !! water from filters was analysed and found conductivity 95 um/cm is it suitable?? or in another way .. what is the maximum conductivity and chloride limits as u know that chloride make color disappear :( , also I used another water sample from another filter it was 350 us/cm .. what should I do to overcome this critical point

Comments

  • DASDAS Member
    You could add carbon and fiber filters and you will see an improvement, but only with a reverse osmosis system you will remove most of it. Those are expensive but effective. In the meantime you can order distilled water from a local supplier. A truck can easily carry 20-40m3. 

    A third option will be to rent a portable filter system until you can fix yours.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    if you want to deionise your water, the most economical way is to use an ion-exchange column in conjunction with a UV lamp; it's a lot cheaper and more portable than reverse osmosis

    the upper limit for conductivity depends on what you're using the water for: if you're using metal-sensitive materials like hydrogen peroxide or thioglycolic acid, or you're making surfactant-based/oral care products, you want it as low as possible (ideally 5 μS/cm or less), but there is some leeway elsewhere

    also, chlorine (with an oxidation state of 0) is an oxidant and causes colour fade - chloride (with an oxidation state of -1) is the reduced form of chlorine, and is generally inert

    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • thank U Das .. but actually the sample analysed and was 95 um/cm was from carbon fiber filter and I wounder about it in color of shower gel or shampoo ... did u try it before ??  or what is the maximum water conductivity u used ?
  • thanks a lot bill :) could u please put a link or any attachment to clarify ion-exchange column in conjunction with a UV lamp and if it is a huge system  and all I want for a temporary situation .. what to use instead ?!! 

    second thanks for the clarification of chlorine and chloride >>> do u have any idea how to reduce chlorine chemically or using any technique ?? 
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    edited February 7
    that depends, are you a home crafter or an industrial user? even for industrial users, it's a compact system; it only takes up a few square feet of floor and wall space, and a system for home users will be smaller still

    this is an industrial system I've set up recently, with the help of a local plumbing firm; the ion-exchange column is on the right of the picture, and the UV lamp is the silver tube mounted on the wall

    also, there shouldn't be any chlorine at all in mains water - if you're worried about it you can buy strips to test the level
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • perfect  :open_mouth: thank u Bill for ur help .. could u please till me about the conductivity of water from ur system ?? and what kind of products used for ?!! thanks a lot 
  • Any UV lamp recommendations? We have a similar system but our plate counts are still too high
  • DASDAS Member
    I don't remember, but it was OK with regular filters. Now im analizing installing the exact softener Bill posted.

    As for chlorine, yes, it happens sometimes. I don't know what's the protocol for water treatment plants, maybe some sort of emergency release, but I have seen color fading because of it. You could smell it in your skin after washing your hands. Carbon filters should do the trick.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    edited February 19
    EVchem said:
    Any UV lamp recommendations? We have a similar system but our plate counts are still too high
    what's the typical temperature of your water?

    depending on the time of year, ours is between 5 and 15 °C, so it's far too cold to sustain significant microbial growth; if it's between 25 and 40 °C, that's the region where growth is fastest

    Mary24 said:
    perfect  :open_mouth: thank u Bill for ur help .. could u please till me about the conductivity of water from ur system ?? and what kind of products used for ?!! thanks a lot 
    the measured resistivity varies between 1-8 MΩ.cm and we use it for face creams, cleansers, toners and serums; nothing exceptionally sensitive, but if we were to make more ion-sensitive products like mouthwash the quality would be more than sufficient

    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • @Bill_Toge oh my- makes sense but very different from what we could achieve without extra equipment! we are based in Florida so it's worst case scenario of nice warm temperatures. Even in a "controlled" room we still can get pretty hot.
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    EVchem said:
    @Bill_Toge oh my- makes sense but very different from what we could achieve without extra equipment! we are based in Florida so it's worst case scenario of nice warm temperatures. Even in a "controlled" room we still can get pretty hot.
    sounds like you need more aggressive anti-microbial measures than just a UV lamp; chlorinating your water at a few ppm should help, and giving it a brief 'blitz' of 10,000-20,000 ppm every other month should help eliminate any resistant stragglers
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
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