Making a safe body spray

BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
After reading the horror story about creams based on paraffin I realised that my proposed body spray deodorant isn't safe because I used a high percentage of ethanol to get it to dry very fast.
Reducing the alcohol level to a safe percentage is going to result in a product that doesn't dry fast enough.
I was thinking of making a mixture of ethanol and isopropyl alcohol but the latter has a flash point even lower than ethanol and is also inflammable.
How to get past this problem?
Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.

Comments

  • BobzchemistBobzchemist Member, PCF student
    Volatile dimethicone/cyclomethicone?
    Robert Zonis, Sr. Formulation Chemist, Beaumont Products "All opinions and comments expressed are my own, have no relation to Beaumont Products, are fully copyrighted, and may not be used without written permission."
  • PerryPerry Administrator, Professional Chemist
    What @Bobzchemist said.  That would be my first suggestion. 
  • problem with silicones is they do mt dry very fast,Why don't you make an aerosol spray?
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    Can't go pressurised, that's only for big companies!
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • got it ---good luck ---guess as Bob suggested you could try D4 or D5 
  • Bill_TogeBill_Toge Member, Professional Chemist
    isododecane is another good one, it's typically my go-to option for anhydrous products where a dry finish is required
    UK based formulation chemist. Strongest subjects: hair styling, hair bleaches, hair dyes (oxidative and non-oxidative) I know some stuff about: EU regulations, emulsions (O/W and W/O), toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoos, other toiletries
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    http://www.scientificspectator.com/documents/silicone spectator/Silicone_Spectator_December_2008_Supplement.pdf

    Check out the evaporation rate of 0.65 CPS Dimethicone, gone in 24 hours completely. 
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    Thanks - but I want something that dries in less than a minute, not 24 hours.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    What I want is a simple hand-spray bottle that people could use in a gym, for instance, to spray on a mist that dries in seconds. Can't have people "waiting to dry" I don't think that would be an attractive product. I will conduct some tests to see at what percentage ethanol is a flash-fire risk.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • BelassiBelassi Member, PCF student
    What I found was, that there's no absolute cut-off point. 70% ethanol is pretty fiery and a film sprayed on a surface will ignite. 35% ethanol still shows a bit of fire if sprayed into a flame but it doesn't persist at all, and a film of it on a surface will only ignite if the surface is pretty hot, eg cooking temp.
    30% seems a reasonable compromise.
    Cosmetic Brand Creation. Concept to name to IMPI search to logo and brand registration. In-house graphic design inc. Pantone specs. Cosmetic label and box design & graphics.
  • johnbjohnb Member, Professional Chemist
    You ask in your header if the flammability of ethanol is a problem in body sprays. Your comparative of the flammability of creams is invalid as the circumstances between the two situations are completely different.

    The problem in using silicones, and dilute alcohol (with or without IPA) or isododecane is the solubility - or otherwise - of other components, particularly fragrance, in the spray. I think you will find that isododecane quite flammable as well.

    The best thing to do is check marketed sprays already on store shelves and see what is the most commonly used carrier in this type of product. In most markets it will be alcohol (ethanol).
  • Chemist77Chemist77 Member, PCF student
    Agree with @johnb, just don't use it while cooking near the stove. Will keep safe surely. 
  • johnbjohnb Member, Professional Chemist
    :) As the product is designed to be used in a gym there ought not to be any stoves in the vicinity and if you're worried about smoking (tobacco or other "substances") then that doesn't fit with attending a gym either.
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